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Trade School or College?

By the end of the 1950s, the focus of education in the United States shifted from vocational and job-ready skills to preparing all high school students, through college prep courses, for college. However, today, statistics indicate that the highly coveted bachelor’s degree doesn’t seem to carry the weight it once did.

The latest figures from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) indicate that approximately 68 percent of high school students attend college. The remaining students graduate with neither academic nor job-ready skills. But even the 68 percent aren’t fairing that well. Almost 40 percent of these students, as low as 10 percent for those in poverty, don’t complete a four-year college program, wasting a lot of time and money, and often acquiring significant student debt. Of those students who do graduate, the BLS found that about 37 percent end up with jobs they could’ve obtained with a high school degree.

In the United States, a college degree has been viewed as the pathway to success, and it still is for many. Earnings studies do show that college graduates earn more over their lifetime than high school graduates. However, these studies don’t take into account the amount of debt these students take on in pursuit of higher education (the outstanding student debt balance in the U.S. was $1.5 trillion as of 2018, according to the Federal Reserve) nor that more than half of recent college graduates are unemployed or underemployed. In addition, these studies don’t include data on those high school students who graduated with vocational training. These graduates have gone on to well-paying, skilled jobs, creating a rosier picture for them than many of their college graduate counterparts.

The U.S. economy has changed. The manufacturing sector is growing and modernizing. This, along with the demise of vocational education in high school and retiring baby boomer, skilled trades workers, has created, and will continue to create, a significant demand for skilled labor. The skills shortage in manufacturing today has created a wealth of opportunities for high school and unemployed and underemployed graduates alike. Many of these jobs are attainable through apprenticeships, on-the-job training, and vocational programs offered at community colleges.

Even with the above statistics aside, the traditional 4-year degree isn’t for everyone. People have a diverse range of skills and learning styles. Some do best in a lecture hall or classroom, studying math, biology, history and other traditional subjects, while others learn best by doing, and would thrive in a studio, workshop or shop floor.

There are still many advantages to a 4-year degree. As stated before, most college graduates will earn more money over their lifetime, especially if they continue their studies through master’s or doctoral degrees. However, the cost/benefit equation to higher education is changing every day. The education system needs to recognize this and that vocational schools can offer students with valuable skills, resulting in competitive paying jobs and a secure financial future. Students need to be exposed to the possibility of vocational training as an alternative to the college degree, helping both them and their parents see a variety of paths to a successful future.

Nurturing the Entrepreneurial Spirit in the Workplace

Many employees have fantasized about being their own boss.
But, they typically don’t act on it because of the responsibility and/or risk associated
with owning and running a company. This doesn’t mean, however, these employees
don’t harbor the entrepreneurial traits, which if nurtured, could take the
organization to a whole new level of success.

As businesses strive for increased competitiveness, creating
an entrepreneurial culture has become an important advantage.  In today’s business environment, the term
entrepreneurial means more than just the business intelligence required to turn
an idea into an enterprise. It’s a skill or mindset embodying innovation,
creativity, calculated risk-taking and empowerment. It’s the responsibility of leaders
to identify, tap into and cultivate these traits within their organization.

Sometimes referred to as an “intrapreneur” (entrepreneurs
working within a company), these employees can be identified by the following
traits:

  1. Creativity
    – Innovation stems from creativity. This drives the company forward.
    Intrapreneurs change the status quo and notice opportunities.

  • Long-term
    focus
    – A person who is creative and innovative must also be focused,
    otherwise they will fleet from one shiny object…new idea to another. The
    intrapreneur can identify what adds value to the company and what doesn’t.

  • Team
    player
    – Naturally, teamwork is essential in a business. Yet, it’s the
    ability to realize that sometimes others have to take control that makes the
    intrapreneur standout in the company.

  • Risk-taker
    – Playing it safe in today’s world will get you nowhere. Intrapreneurs aren’t risk
    adverse.

  • Results
    oriented
    – The intrapreneur is more concerned about the results than the process.

  • Take
    responsibility
    – The intrapreneur takes ownership of his or her successes
    as well as his or her failures.

  • Adaptable
    – The business landscape is continually changing. The intrapreneur is very
    flexible to change and can quickly adapt, especially in high-pressure
    situations.

  • Planners
    – Intrapreneurs develop a plan and then work the plan.

  • Effective
    – Intrapreneurs are more interested in how effective each task or activity
    is as opposed to concentrating solely on efficiency.

Once a company leader recognizes the intrapreneurs in
his/her organization, he or she must take the next steps to cultivate these
traits.

Create an environment
of empowerment

It’s a business leader’s actions that create an environment
of empowerment. It’s his or her leadership style. Research shows that
leadership based on relationships increases the entrepreneurial spirit of the
company as opposed to task oriented leadership style. An effective leader leads
by example.

Encourage innovation

Innovation keeps a company competitive and growing. In large
companies with layers of management, the innovative spirit can often get lost.
Leaders must welcome, encourage and reward innovative thinking in the
workplace.

Welcome internal
competition

Competition amongst co-workers, if handled correctly, can
spur incentive and innovation. Healthy competition can drive co-workers to push
one another to be more productive and produce better work.

Communicate

Communication is a fundamental function of good leadership.
Leaders often get so caught up in the day-to-day operations of the business
that they forget to tell their staff where they are going – the company’s
vision and direction. Employees want to get the important information. They
also want to know that their concerns and ideas are being heard. Leaders must
continually communicate to their staff that the entrepreneurial approach is
valued, encouraged and rewarded.

Buying Your Teen a Car

It’s hard to believe but your baby, now a teenager, is a licensed driver and wants a car. Yes, the time has finally arrived; your child wants the keys to his or her own car. So, what’s a practical, cautious parent to do…other than have a nervous breakdown, that is?

First and foremost, dispel the notion that every teenager needs a car. Many kids get along just fine without having their own set of wheels. They walk, ride a bike or a skateboard, get rides from you or their friends or take advantage of local public transportation.

However, many teenagers today do have their own cars. All you have to do is peruse your local high school parking lot. It’s filled with students’ cars. But, when contemplating whether you should purchase a car for your son or daughter, you should consider the following:

1. Does your teen want a car because his or her friends are getting one or does he or she want one because they need one to get back and forth to an after school job? If his or her primary reason is to have one because “everyone else has one,” then he or she doesn’t really need a car.

2. Is your teenager responsible enough to have his or her own car?

3. Will getting your teenager a car make life significantly easier for you? For example, if his or her school is 30 minutes from home and you are having to make several round trips a day to take him or her as well as your other children to school each day, another car in the family may be the answer. In other words, if you were spending a good portion of your day as a kid chauffer, this would be a practical reason to get your teen a car, and would take a lot of pressure off you as well.

4. Is it financially viable to buy another car? Even a good used car can be expensive. If purchasing another car is a strain on your finances and your teen can’t help out with the purchase, it would be wise to postpone buying a car until you are in a better financial position or your teen can purchase him or herself.

Okay, if after careful consideration, you’ve decided to get your teen a car, what steps can you take to make sure your son or daughter is a safe as possible on the road?

The conventional wisdom has always been to buy a big car or a road tank. This will provide a thick layer of metal insulation around your child. The truth is, size does matter. It’s basic physics. When two heavy objects collide, the heavier one wins!
Size is a big issue, especially on the freeway. The higher you sit in a car on the freeway, the more the chassis and frame is going to absorb the impact.

The next big question is whether to buy new or used. For most parents, who are already making payments on their own cars, a used car is the only economically feasible option. Another thing to consider when buying new or used is the insurance. The insurance premium on a new car, primarily driven by a young driver, is very expensive.

Experts agree that if parents are going to buy a used car for their teen, they should do their homework. Parents will want to look at the research, specifically government crash testing results (iihs.org or nhtsa.gov), as well as safety options that come with the car they’re considering for their son or daughter. Get as many safety features as possible.

You will also want to check the car over very thoroughly – the tires, the headlights, the turn signals, the brakes, as well as make sure the safety equipment is in good working order. If possible, have a reputable service technician give the car a complete once-over before purchasing it or if you can afford it, look for certified, pre-owned models that are two or three years old, often from an expired lease.
Much to your child’s dismay it’s not about looks, it’s about safety. Parents must rise above what their child wants and focus on what’s in the best interest of their child’s safety. Safety experts highly recommend staying away from the cool, sporty convertibles or cars that come equipped with large engines.

Once you’ve narrowed down the safest choices, find a good deal. Websites such as Edmunds.com, Kelley Blue Book, IntelliChoice.com and Truecar.com can help you determine a fair price given a vehicle’s age, mileage and condition.

Last, but certainly not least, safety experts agree that the most important factor in purchasing a car for your teen is proper training for your teen. If there’s no formal driver’s education program, then it is recommended that parents create their own training program. Driving is a difficult and complicated lengthy learning process. Insurance rates for young people do not come down until age 25. Until then, these drivers are considered “at risk” drivers.

The key to any driving program is parental involvement. There should be a nighttime curfew for beginner drivers, zero tolerance for alcohol and the parent and teen should use a contract or come up with something similar, in writing, that outlines the whens, whereas and with whoms.

Driving is a major milestone in your child’s life. Make it a safe one…one they can remember for a lifetime.

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