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Helping Your Child Establish Credit

Preparing your child for adulthood is daunting. As a parent, no matter how old your child becomes, worrying about their health and safety will always remain in the forefront. However, as they begin to mature into young adults, their financial future becomes a growing concern.  Often overlooked, and yet, equally as important as helping your child choose a career path that is right for them, is helping your child establish credit.  

Here are a few tips to help you begin building credit for
your kids.

First and foremost, begin the “money talk” with your kids
while they are young. You should begin discussing basic financial concepts like
saving (help them open a savings account) and delayed gratification when they
are in elementary school. As they get older, introduce more complex concepts,
such as insurance, investing, credit cards and borrowing, and explain what
credit really means – the building blocks of consumer credit – and why it’s so
important. As a responsible parent, you should also make sure your credit
habits provide a good example.

In addition to providing a good financial
education…foundation, the following steps will help ensure your young, adult
child is well on his or her way by the time they are flying solo.

  1. Help them
    open a checking account.
    Show your child how a checking account works as
    well as the penalties associated with them if they overdraw their account or
    bounce checks. Once they understand and are comfortable with the basics, ease
    them into a debit card. This gives them some spending independence, while
    limiting it to the balance in their checking account.

  • Have
    them get a part-time job.
    A strong work ethic is a vital part of your child
    becoming a responsible adult. Having a part-time job in high school provides them
    with a valuable life lesson – the excitement of watching their savings grow and
    the frustration of seeing it disappear, especially if it’s due to a poor
    decision. This lesson is a precursor to understanding credit. In addition, the
    income provided by a part-time job will help them when they apply for their own
    credit card.

  • Add
    them as an authorized user on your credit card.
     As long as your own credit habits are sound,
    this is a good way to help your child establish his or her own credit record.  As an authorized user, your teen will usually
    get a credit card in his or her name, tied to your account. Typically, this
    account will also go on your child’s credit record.By setting ground rules for what they can charge and how and when
    (on-time) payments will be made, you will enhance your child’s understanding of
    how credit works as well as help their credit grow.

You can also add them as an authorized user without
giving them access to the account. Without giving them the possibility…opportunity
of overspending, you can still help them grow their credit as you use the
credit card and pay it off every month.

  • Have
    your college-aged child apply for a student credit card.
    Once your late
    teen has established good financial habits and income to support a credit line (usually
    income from a part-time job is sufficient), they may be ready to apply for
    their own credit card. These cards typically have lower credit limits and
    higher interest rates than general credit cards.

  • Help
    your college-aged child apply for a secured credit card.
    This is another
    option if your young, adult child is unable to get a student credit card. A
    secured credit card requires the cardholder to put down a deposit, typically a
    few hundred dollars, which is usually the credit limit they are given. Because
    there is little risk to the bank/credit card company with this type of card,
    most people can get approved.

Make 2015 the year of organization

Happy 2015! It’s hard to believe another year is behind us. If you’re like most people, you’ve either vigorously begun attacking your New Year’s resolution list or at least contemplated making one.

While losing weight and getting your financial house in order are always popular to-dos, another worthy candidate is getting your life organized.

Keep in mind, being organized is not an inborn or inherited trait. It’s a learned behavior by cultivating healthy habits and maintaining those habits to keep your life in order.

If being organized is a priority this year, remember, Rome wasn’t built in a day. Don’t set yourself up for failure by trying to overhaul your life in one month. It will be too overwhelming. You will have a greater opportunity for success if you have an overall plan or goal and by starting with a few key steps or habits to help you get organized over the year, rather than trying to get it done in one fell swoop.

Here are some suggestions:

1. Write things down – whether you are trying to remember birthdays, doctor’s appointments or items on your grocery list, make it permanent. Put pen to paper or use the calendar on your computer or smart phone.

2. Make schedules and deadlines – being organized goes hand-in-hand with using your time efficiently. Don’t waste time. Make and keep schedules for the day and week and stick to them.

3. Don’t procrastinate – the longer you wait to start something the more difficult it is to get it done. If one of your goals is to have a less stressful life, getting organized is the answer. Checking to-dos off your list will make you a happier and healthier person.

4. Find a home for everything – keeping your life organized begins with keeping your things in their proper places. Keep order by storing things properly and labeling the storage spaces. Put things that you use on a regular basis in easy-to-access storage spaces. Don’t let these spaces get cluttered and never label a storage space “miscellaneous.”

5. Declutter and weed out regularly – find time each week, possibly on cleaning day, to reorganize and get rid of things you don’t need or want. Less stuff means less clutter. Have a yard sale, donate to a thrift shop, take a trip to the recycling center or sell unwanted items on one of the popular resale websites.

6. Delegate responsibilities – don’t try to do everything yourself. Look at your to-do list (remember step one, write things down) and find tasks that you can remove and give to someone else. By doing this, you will eliminate the stress that is caused by thinking that the whole world rests on your shoulders.

7. Work hard – again, Rome wasn’t built in a day. Getting your currently disorganized world organized is going to take some effort on your part.

Getting and staying organized isn’t a walk in the park. It takes a plan, hard work and commitment. But, the rewards of a less stressful, clutter-free life are well worth the effort.

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