Credit Card Chips are Coming

The Chip Cards are Coming!

In a continual effort to reduce fraudulent credit card charges and increase security, the credit card companies are moving away from magnetic-stripe cards, which are easier to counterfeit, and towards the EMV chip card as soon as possible.

According to a recent report by Barclays, almost half of the world’s credit card fraud happens in the United States, even though only a quarter of all credit card transactions occur here. This statistic, in addition to the Target and Neiman Marcus security breaches, are the major motivators behind the changeover.

In an attempt to reduce this statistic and future breaches in security, the EMV (Europay, MasterCard and Visa) chip card is already being rolled out across the U.S., and by October of 2015 merchants will be pretty much forced (see below) to upgrade their machines.

These cards, which have been status quo for in EU and Canada for several years, are manufactured with a small integrated circuit or chip in the card. Payment data (name, billing address, phone number, etc.) is read from this chip instead of the magnetic stripe. This chip protects against fraud in two ways: making it more difficult and expensive to counterfeit and varying the way the data is transmitted each time the card is read. Consequently, while the magnetic-stripe card can be skimmed easily, chip information will be much harder to garner.

Processing device providers are promising to make the transition for their customers (merchants) as flawless and cost-effective as possible. They are also working on several solutions for their Square Stand customers.

Chip cards will not be swiped in the same way as the magnetic-stripe cards, hence the new processing equipment. The cards are inserted into the payment device and left in place for the entire transaction as the reader and the card talk back and forth.

Although this new measure goes a long way to thwart fraud, it will not provide any added protection against the card-not-present transaction, i.e. purchases online or over the phone.

Even though merchants will have the option of using their current processing technology because the new chip cards will still have the magnetic stripe as a backup, starting in October 2015, the liability for fraud will shift to the cardholder and the merchant. In other words, since the EMV terminal could have theoretically prevented the fraud, the liability now falls on the user (the customer) and the processor (the merchant/business).

The timeline for the EMV Chip Card Liability Shift in the U.S.

October 1, 2015 – Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover liability shift to POS terminals.

October 1, 2016 – MasterCard liability shift for ATMs.

October 1, 2017 – Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover liability shift to pay-at-pump gas stations, as well as for Visa and American Express at ATMs.

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