Community Bank Flagler County

Trade School or College?

By the end of the 1950s, the focus of education in the United States shifted from vocational and job-ready skills to preparing all high school students, through college prep courses, for college. However, today, statistics indicate that the highly coveted bachelor’s degree doesn’t seem to carry the weight it once did.

The latest figures from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) indicate that approximately 68 percent of high school students attend college. The remaining students graduate with neither academic nor job-ready skills. But even the 68 percent aren’t fairing that well. Almost 40 percent of these students, as low as 10 percent for those in poverty, don’t complete a four-year college program, wasting a lot of time and money, and often acquiring significant student debt. Of those students who do graduate, the BLS found that about 37 percent end up with jobs they could’ve obtained with a high school degree.

In the United States, a college degree has been viewed as the pathway to success, and it still is for many. Earnings studies do show that college graduates earn more over their lifetime than high school graduates. However, these studies don’t take into account the amount of debt these students take on in pursuit of higher education (the outstanding student debt balance in the U.S. was $1.5 trillion as of 2018, according to the Federal Reserve) nor that more than half of recent college graduates are unemployed or underemployed. In addition, these studies don’t include data on those high school students who graduated with vocational training. These graduates have gone on to well-paying, skilled jobs, creating a rosier picture for them than many of their college graduate counterparts.

The U.S. economy has changed. The manufacturing sector is growing and modernizing. This, along with the demise of vocational education in high school and retiring baby boomer, skilled trades workers, has created, and will continue to create, a significant demand for skilled labor. The skills shortage in manufacturing today has created a wealth of opportunities for high school and unemployed and underemployed graduates alike. Many of these jobs are attainable through apprenticeships, on-the-job training, and vocational programs offered at community colleges.

Even with the above statistics aside, the traditional 4-year degree isn’t for everyone. People have a diverse range of skills and learning styles. Some do best in a lecture hall or classroom, studying math, biology, history and other traditional subjects, while others learn best by doing, and would thrive in a studio, workshop or shop floor.

There are still many advantages to a 4-year degree. As stated before, most college graduates will earn more money over their lifetime, especially if they continue their studies through master’s or doctoral degrees. However, the cost/benefit equation to higher education is changing every day. The education system needs to recognize this and that vocational schools can offer students with valuable skills, resulting in competitive paying jobs and a secure financial future. Students need to be exposed to the possibility of vocational training as an alternative to the college degree, helping both them and their parents see a variety of paths to a successful future.

National Internet Safety Month

June is designated as National Internet Safety Month as a
means of spotlighting the importance of safe online practices for you and your
family.

As we head into summer, and, according to the National Cyber
Security Alliance, our children and teens begin spending an average of 7.5
hours each day with electronic devices, this month provides the perfect time to
spread awareness of the various ways we can keep our families and ourselves
safe on the Internet.

Today, with social media and social networking becoming
increasingly important in people’s everyday lives, even Grandma’s, ensuring a
safe online experience for you and your family can seem daunting. So, here are
a few guidelines that can help you keep the entire family safe in today’s
increasingly threatening digital world.

  • Home
    Wi-Fi Security

Your home Wi-Fi gives your children or
grandchildren access to the Internet from anywhere in your house. This makes it
more difficult to monitor their online activity. So, make sure your Wi-Fi is
highly secured by using strong router passwords, enabling wireless encryption,
to prevent strangers from seeing or having access to your network.

  • Read
    Online Privacy Policies Carefully

Websites and social networks that require
basic information from you when you create an account with them have privacy
policies. So, whenever you or a family member want to join a new social network
or set up a new website account make sure you know the creator’s privacy
policies – how they intend to use your information and what they do to ensure
the information you give them remains safe from dangers such as phishing and
identity theft.

  • Ensure the
    Whole Family Practices Safe Social Networking

Unless a social network is specifically
created for kids, a child under the age of 13 shouldn’t subscribe to a social
network. However, everyone else that does should use their personal information
wisely – don’t use full names, disclose birthdays or addresses. In addition,
you shouldn’t discuss your vacation plans or share photos with identifiable
details (your home address, car license plate number, etc.). You should also
talk to your children about cyberbullying and online predators and stalkers.

  • Ensure
    Safe Online Gaming

Kids and teens can interact with
their friends and people they don’t know in a fun way via live online games. However,
this can expose them to dangers such as bullying and predators. Make sure your
child uses only a nickname or an avatar (a icon or a figure) when playing
games. In addition, carefully monitor your child’s play and use the parental
controls – safety measures – the game offers.

  • Install
    Parental Control Tools on Family Computers

Although open communication and trust
is always the best practice when it comes to your child’s online use, some
extra precaution doesn’t hurt. Parental control tools can block your child’s
access to inappropriate websites as well as monitor their online activity.
Implementing a parental control tool isn’t about spying on your child. It’s
about keeping them safe from the growing number of online dangers.

  • Create
    Safe Passwords

Creating strong account passwords will help
keep hackers from breaching your online accounts and stealing your identity.
Create a strong, unique password for each online account and change it
regularly.  Make your passwords long, at
least eight characters, and a mix of letters, numbers and symbols. Also,
whenever possible, use security questions with answers only you’d know. Teach
your family members this practice as well.

  • Install A
    Complete Internet Security Program on Family Computers

An effective security program will protect you
and your family from malicious links, viruses and malware.

  • Only
    Download and Install Software from Trusted Sources

The Internet provides access to free games,
movies, etc. However, some of them contain spyware and other types of malware
that can compromise your computer as well as the whole family’s Internet
security.

  • Look for
    https:// in Website URLs

The https:// at the beginning of a web
address means it’s a secure site. This should appear in every bank or online
shopping site you use. In addition, if you or a family member bank or shop
online, make sure the Wi-Fi is secure.

  • Recognize
    and Avoid Phishing Scams

Cybercrooks are after your personal
information, and they’ll use all kinds of email and text scams to try to obtain
it. Watch out for alarming messages and threats of bank account or credit card
closures. You and your family members should also be wary of requests for
charitable donations, lottery wins and giveaways as well as links contained in
suspicious looking emails, texts or websites.

  • Backup
    Important Files/Data on Your Computer Regularly

You never know when your computer will crash
or become the victim of an accident or a cyber attack. So, backup your home
computers on a regular basis to keep your data safe and sound.

  • Stay
    Informed About Internet Security Threats

The best defense is always a good offense.
You don’t have to be an Internet security specialist/analyst to defend your
family from online dangers. You just need some basic knowledge.  So, do your homework and stay informed.

Nurturing the Entrepreneurial Spirit in the Workplace

Many employees have fantasized about being their own boss.
But, they typically don’t act on it because of the responsibility and/or risk associated
with owning and running a company. This doesn’t mean, however, these employees
don’t harbor the entrepreneurial traits, which if nurtured, could take the
organization to a whole new level of success.

As businesses strive for increased competitiveness, creating
an entrepreneurial culture has become an important advantage.  In today’s business environment, the term
entrepreneurial means more than just the business intelligence required to turn
an idea into an enterprise. It’s a skill or mindset embodying innovation,
creativity, calculated risk-taking and empowerment. It’s the responsibility of leaders
to identify, tap into and cultivate these traits within their organization.

Sometimes referred to as an “intrapreneur” (entrepreneurs
working within a company), these employees can be identified by the following
traits:

  1. Creativity
    – Innovation stems from creativity. This drives the company forward.
    Intrapreneurs change the status quo and notice opportunities.

  • Long-term
    focus
    – A person who is creative and innovative must also be focused,
    otherwise they will fleet from one shiny object…new idea to another. The
    intrapreneur can identify what adds value to the company and what doesn’t.

  • Team
    player
    – Naturally, teamwork is essential in a business. Yet, it’s the
    ability to realize that sometimes others have to take control that makes the
    intrapreneur standout in the company.

  • Risk-taker
    – Playing it safe in today’s world will get you nowhere. Intrapreneurs aren’t risk
    adverse.

  • Results
    oriented
    – The intrapreneur is more concerned about the results than the process.

  • Take
    responsibility
    – The intrapreneur takes ownership of his or her successes
    as well as his or her failures.

  • Adaptable
    – The business landscape is continually changing. The intrapreneur is very
    flexible to change and can quickly adapt, especially in high-pressure
    situations.

  • Planners
    – Intrapreneurs develop a plan and then work the plan.

  • Effective
    – Intrapreneurs are more interested in how effective each task or activity
    is as opposed to concentrating solely on efficiency.

Once a company leader recognizes the intrapreneurs in
his/her organization, he or she must take the next steps to cultivate these
traits.

Create an environment
of empowerment

It’s a business leader’s actions that create an environment
of empowerment. It’s his or her leadership style. Research shows that
leadership based on relationships increases the entrepreneurial spirit of the
company as opposed to task oriented leadership style. An effective leader leads
by example.

Encourage innovation

Innovation keeps a company competitive and growing. In large
companies with layers of management, the innovative spirit can often get lost.
Leaders must welcome, encourage and reward innovative thinking in the
workplace.

Welcome internal
competition

Competition amongst co-workers, if handled correctly, can
spur incentive and innovation. Healthy competition can drive co-workers to push
one another to be more productive and produce better work.

Communicate

Communication is a fundamental function of good leadership.
Leaders often get so caught up in the day-to-day operations of the business
that they forget to tell their staff where they are going – the company’s
vision and direction. Employees want to get the important information. They
also want to know that their concerns and ideas are being heard. Leaders must
continually communicate to their staff that the entrepreneurial approach is
valued, encouraged and rewarded.

Planning a Memorable Family Summer Vacation without Breaking the Bank

As the last bell rings for the school year and the kids head out the doors gleefully chanting, “No more school,” their cares are left behind and replaced with thoughts of staying up late, sleeping till noon, hanging out at the beach, and just “chillin” with friends.  Unfortunately, for most of us parents, our worries and homework have just begun.  Our once toyed with ideas for this year’s perfect summer family vacation must NOW turn into a planned, scheduled, and booked reality. The struggle for most of us is not the vacation itself, but ultimately providing a memorable experience for the entire family that doesn’t deplete the savings account or burn the numbers off our credit cards.

So, how do we create the perfect blend of quantity and quality, while remaining fiscally responsible?  Actually, it’s easier than we think.  As busy, intelligent, organized overachievers, we tend to overcomplicate and overplan everything, including the family summer hiatus.  So, let’s begin by thinking outside of the proverbial box and get back to some old fashioned basics; the availability of limited technology and the K.I.S.S. principle.

Today’s technology has undermined the true definition of vacation.  Think back to a time when you couldn’t be called, emailed, texted or posted while away from the office or the house. To really allow yourself and your family to take a quality break from everyday modern life and the sophistication that accompanies it, make a family pact to leave technology behind.  Bring one cell phone, designated only for emergencies, and put an “on vacation” voicemail message on the remaining phones and an auto reply on emails.

With technology in check, let’s begin planning a vacation that both our budget and family will love!  This is where the K.I.S.S. principle applies – keep your adventure uncomplicated. The challenge is to find age-appropriate activities that aren’t mind-numbing for adults or boring for kids. The ultimate family vacation choice is one that provides a simple mix of physical activity, education, and sightseeing opportunities.  So, after doing a bit of homework, here are my top three frugal, yet memorable family summer vacation ideas to get you going.

  1. The Road Trip Vacation

Even with higher gas prices, the All-American family road trip is still one of the least expensive options.  Choose an ultimate destination (e.g. Washington D.C., Black Hills, South Dakota, Las Vegas or any of our incredible National Parks) and then plan a route which offers interesting, fun stops along the way.  When making your lodging reservations, don’t forget discounts provided by membership organizations and be sure to ask for budget-conscious deals and/or accommodations where kids stay free.  To reduce food costs, look for restaurants with kid’s menus or where kids eat free. Another option is to book a room with a refrigerator or kitchenette.  By preparing some meals yourself, you can reduce your restaurant costs.  So, grab your GPS, pack a large cooler, stop at grocery stores along the way, sing silly songs, play I Spy and the License Plate Game, watch the sun rise and set, and make some wonderful memories.

  1. The Close to Home Vacation

Living in Florida provides a multitude of day trip opportunities.  Make your home your hub.  Depending on the number of vacation days, take in as many local attractions as possible.  Some great suggestions might include spending the day at one of Florida’s beautiful natural springs, venturing out to an unfamiliar beach spot, a trip to the zoo (I’m partial to the Jacksonville Zoo) or even spending the day at one of your family’s favorite theme or water parks.  There are two important prerequisites to make the close to home vacation an enjoyable one.  First and foremost, remember this is a vacation – have a plan with a predetermined schedule of events.  Remind yourself that memorable family quality time doesn’t include cleaning out closets, landscaping the yard or painting the house. Second, as stated earlier, make a family pact to keep this time technology free.

  1. The Camping Vacation

This can be the traditional camping experience, vacationing at any of the many Florida or National state or private parks or the innovative summer “family camp” programs.  Like summer camps for kids, a “family camp” experience comes complete with beautiful settings, simple lodging, meals, campfires and an assortment of imagination stretching activities. Now if you’re feeling really adventurous, this can be combined with the Road Trip vacation.

Although the Road Trip, the Close to Home, and the Camping vacations are my top picks, I’m sure there are many more great ideas out there.  If you have a personal favorite, let me know – I’d love to hear from you!  In the meantime, remember that family vacations are important.  There’s the quality time spent together away from life’s distractions, the laughter and fun and most importantly, memories that will last a lifetime.  So, start Googling, begin planning, and have a wonderful vacation!

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