Community Banking

Nurturing the Entrepreneurial Spirit in the Workplace

Many employees have fantasized about being their own boss.
But, they typically don’t act on it because of the responsibility and/or risk associated
with owning and running a company. This doesn’t mean, however, these employees
don’t harbor the entrepreneurial traits, which if nurtured, could take the
organization to a whole new level of success.

As businesses strive for increased competitiveness, creating
an entrepreneurial culture has become an important advantage.  In today’s business environment, the term
entrepreneurial means more than just the business intelligence required to turn
an idea into an enterprise. It’s a skill or mindset embodying innovation,
creativity, calculated risk-taking and empowerment. It’s the responsibility of leaders
to identify, tap into and cultivate these traits within their organization.

Sometimes referred to as an “intrapreneur” (entrepreneurs
working within a company), these employees can be identified by the following
traits:

  1. Creativity
    – Innovation stems from creativity. This drives the company forward.
    Intrapreneurs change the status quo and notice opportunities.

  • Long-term
    focus
    – A person who is creative and innovative must also be focused,
    otherwise they will fleet from one shiny object…new idea to another. The
    intrapreneur can identify what adds value to the company and what doesn’t.

  • Team
    player
    – Naturally, teamwork is essential in a business. Yet, it’s the
    ability to realize that sometimes others have to take control that makes the
    intrapreneur standout in the company.

  • Risk-taker
    – Playing it safe in today’s world will get you nowhere. Intrapreneurs aren’t risk
    adverse.

  • Results
    oriented
    – The intrapreneur is more concerned about the results than the process.

  • Take
    responsibility
    – The intrapreneur takes ownership of his or her successes
    as well as his or her failures.

  • Adaptable
    – The business landscape is continually changing. The intrapreneur is very
    flexible to change and can quickly adapt, especially in high-pressure
    situations.

  • Planners
    – Intrapreneurs develop a plan and then work the plan.

  • Effective
    – Intrapreneurs are more interested in how effective each task or activity
    is as opposed to concentrating solely on efficiency.

Once a company leader recognizes the intrapreneurs in
his/her organization, he or she must take the next steps to cultivate these
traits.

Create an environment
of empowerment

It’s a business leader’s actions that create an environment
of empowerment. It’s his or her leadership style. Research shows that
leadership based on relationships increases the entrepreneurial spirit of the
company as opposed to task oriented leadership style. An effective leader leads
by example.

Encourage innovation

Innovation keeps a company competitive and growing. In large
companies with layers of management, the innovative spirit can often get lost.
Leaders must welcome, encourage and reward innovative thinking in the
workplace.

Welcome internal
competition

Competition amongst co-workers, if handled correctly, can
spur incentive and innovation. Healthy competition can drive co-workers to push
one another to be more productive and produce better work.

Communicate

Communication is a fundamental function of good leadership.
Leaders often get so caught up in the day-to-day operations of the business
that they forget to tell their staff where they are going – the company’s
vision and direction. Employees want to get the important information. They
also want to know that their concerns and ideas are being heard. Leaders must
continually communicate to their staff that the entrepreneurial approach is
valued, encouraged and rewarded.

Community Bank…More than Just a Name

IntraLogoTMThe recession and subsequent financial fallout put a negative spotlight on “big banks.” This increased the popularity… attractiveness of the community bank.

Many local banks today refer to and market themselves as “community” banks. But, are they really?

What does it mean to be a true community bank? The definition is two-fold – the FDIC’s size, asset-based definition as well as the bank’s behavioral characteristics, how and where it conducts business. Both attributes must be taken into account to determine whether a bank truly is a community bank.

FDIC’s Community Bank Definition

An institution that has less than $1 billion in assets is a community bank if it:

At year-end, does not have an asset concentration exceeding 50% of total assets in non-community specialty banks, including:

  • credit card specialists,
  • consumer nonbank banks
  • industrial loan companies,
  • trust companies, and/or
  • bankers’ banks; and holds less than 10% of its assets in foreign assets.

A bank that has assets of $1 billion or greater is a community bank if it:

At year-end, does not have an asset concentration exceeding 50% of total assets in non-community specialty banks, including:

  • credit card specialists,
  • consumer nonbank banks
  • industrial loan companies,
  • trust companies, and/or
  • bankers’ banks; and holds less than 10% of its assets in foreign assets;
  • Has a ratio of core deposits to assets greater than 50%
  • Has a ratio of loans to assets that exceed 33%
  • Has no single branch office that exceeds the branch maximum deposit limit of $5 billion
  • Has no more than 75 bank offices
  • Operates in no more than two large metropolitan statistical areas (MSA), defined as an MSA with a population of more than 500,000
  • Operates in no more than three states

Behavioral Characteristics of a Community Bank

Community banks focus on providing traditional banking services to the community in which they operate. A community bank obtains most of their core deposits and makes most of their loans, residential and commercial, locally. For this reason, community banks are often considered to be “relationship” bankers as opposed to “transactional” bankers.

A community bank, typically privately owned, locally controlled and with employees often residing in the community they serve, has specialized knowledge of their local community and their customers. This expertise allows them to base credit decisions on local knowledge and nonstandard data derived from long-term relationships with their customers. Community banks are less likely to rely on the standard underwriting models used by big banks.

This relationship approach to lending is particularly important to a community’s small businesses. Small businesses, especially small start-up companies, may be unable to satisfy the requirements of the more structured underwriting guidelines the larger banks use. The community bank’s relationship lending approach is often the only avenue for small businesses to obtain loans and access to other financial services.

Managing relationships at a personal level is the hallmark of community bank.

Beyond the asset-driven definition and behavioral characteristics, a true community bank creates a “community” culture both within and outside its walls.

True community banks get involved with their customers and with the community at large. They sponsor Little League teams, participate in charitable functions and attend social events.  They are visible in their community.

True community banks strive for the best customer service. Unlike the big, national banks, community banks don’t serve millions of customers. Consequently, their customers are more than just an account number on a computer screen. Every customer is treated as a friend and neighbor, which in many cases, especially in small communities, they are.

True community banks put the decision-makers in front of the customer. If you walk into a big bank to apply for a loan, you’ll most likely never meet or speak to the person who makes the decisions. Community banks operate transparently, allowing their customers to communicate with the people who make the financial decisions.

Community banks contribute to the local economy. These institutions stimulate, direct, and improve local economies by opening business accounts for entrepreneurs or extending loans to corporations. The community bank’s fortunes are intimately tied to the fortunes of their local communities. So, they have a vested interest in the economy of the community in which they operate.  The more the community prospers, the more the local community bank benefits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recent Comments