Monthly Archives: June 2020

June: A Celebration of the Men in Your Life

The month of June celebrates the men in your life. Not only is the third Sunday set aside to honor dads, but the entire month of June is dedicated to taking stock of the health of the men in your life as well.

Men’s Health Month, a national observance anchored by a Congressional health education program and recognized by the White House and the official symbol, a blue ribbon, is an annual observance to raise awareness of preventable health problems and encourage early detection and treatment of diseases including cancer, heart disease and depression. Health fairs and other health education and outreached activities will be held across the country to encourage men to take care of their bodies by eating healthy, exercising and working to prevent disease.

According to menshealth.org, men, on average, die almost five years earlier than women. This is due, in part, to the fact that men are more reluctant to go to the doctor. Studies indicate that women tend to go to the doctor twice as much as men. Consequently, Men’s Health Month provides the perfect opportunity to motivate, promote and support healthy habits in the men in your life.  Here are a few ways you can do this:

Encourage him to get a physical – Most of the contributors to men, on average, having a shorter lifespan than women are preventable. This prevention begins with a physical with a primary care provider. This establishes baselines for factors such as blood pressure, cholesterol, weight and PSA (a screening test for prostate cancer risk). These visits should continue annually to monitor how these factors change over time, consequently, catching potentially dangerous conditions early, while they’re still treatable.

Encourage him to exercise – The benefits to physical activity on our health, especially as we age, are extensive. However, most of us are not motivated to exercise on our own. So, make it a partnership…find fun ways to get fit together. Join a gym, sign up for personal training or make walks part of your regular routine. Adults need about 2.5 hours of physical activity each week.

Encourage him to eat healthy – Help him make healthy eating choices by including a variety of fruits, vegetables and lean meats in your diet. Limit foods and drinks that are high in calories, fat, sugar, salt and alcohol.

Encourage him (if he does) to quit smoking – Set the example for him by choosing not to smoke and encourage him to quit. Quitting smoking has immediate and long-term benefits such as lowering the risk for different types of cancer as well as other cardiovascular and lung diseases.

Encourage him to recognize and reduce stress in his life – Physical and emotional illness are often a byproduct of long-term stress. Encourage him to learn how to manage stress in his life through finding support, eating healthy, exercising regularly and avoiding alcohol and drugs.

Encourage him to seek help for depression – Depression is one of the leading causes of disease or injury for both men and women worldwide. Learn to recognize the signs, which include persistent sadness, grumpiness, feelings of hopelessness, fatigue and decreased energy, and thoughts of suicide, and how you can help the men in your life. If someone in your life is in crisis, seek help immediately by:

  • Calling 911
  • Visiting your local ER or healthcare provider
  • Calling the toll-free, 24-hour National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255); TTY: 1-800-799-4TTY (4889) to talk to a trained counselor.

And lastly,

Let him know you care – Men often disregard their own health because they’re too preoccupied with taking care of everyone else. So, remind him how much he’s loved and how important he is to you and other family members, and that you want and need him to stay alive and healthy as long as possible.

Life After Covid-19 – Scenarios of Economic Recovery

As the cases of Covid-19 begin to level off, many states are cautiously reopening and beginning to loosen their social distancing restrictions in hopes of jumpstarting their economy.

The coronavirus pandemic has devastated the U.S. and world economy, plummeting economic activity and causing soaring unemployment rates. Social distancing policies designed to slow the spread of the disease have resulted in an economic decline that rivals the Great Depression.

So, what can we expect over the next several months? Will the economic recovery be as painful as the coronavirus-linked lockdowns or will there be a bounceback or possibly a scenario in between these extremes?

Currently, economic analysts are debating the following scenarios of recovery:

The “Z-Shaped” Recovery – This most optimistic scenario predicts that the post-pandemic economy bounces back above the pre-pandemic baseline due to pent-up demand, creating a temporary economic boom. In other words, once the risk of the pandemic passes, we will come out in full force, shopping and dining and taking those trips we postponed.

The “V-Shaped” Recovery – The next best recovery scenario suggests that although the economy permanently loses the production that would have occurred absent the pandemic, it will quickly return to its pre-pandemic baseline once social distancing restrictions have been lifted. In other words, the economy will go back to its pre-virus state.

The “W-Shaped” Recovery – This double-dip scenario suggests that there will be a surge in COVID-19 cases after the initial re-openings, causing another round of closures, causing another downturn in the economy prior to a recovery.

The “U-Shaped” Recovery – This scenario suggests that GDP remains low for some time, possibly more than a couple of quarters after the lockdowns have been lifted, resulting in the economy recovering, returning to its baseline slowly.

The “Swoosh-Shaped” Recovery – Borrowed from Nike’s logo, this scenario suggests that after a sharp downturn the economy will gradually bounce back as restrictions are eased and consumers, businesses and state and local governments are willing to spend. Many economists believe this or the U-Shaped recoveries are the likeliest scenarios.

The “L-Shaped” Recovery – This most pessimistic scenario suggests that the pandemic has a permanent affect on GDP, causing growth to continue to decline and not recover for some time. This is pretty much what the Great Depression recovery looked like. Most economists believe this scenario is unlikely unless the number of global coronavirus cases continue to rise, forcing more lockdowns.

The common thread that runs through these various scenarios is that they contain some variation of the tradeoff between the physical health response and economic response. As the economy reopens, measures will still be in place that will curtail economic activity to some degree – businesses will have to space workers and customers further apart, travel will be less common, restaurants will be serving fewer customers at a time, and activities involving large crowds will remain off limits for possibly a long time. Many people will be reluctant to return to life as it was prior to the pandemic, settling into a new “normal.”

Although economists have different recovery theories, they seem to be in agreement that the economy isn’t going to rebound overnight. The key question, however, is whether the damage to our economy will be long lasting.

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