Are You Prepared for a Natural Disaster?

Collectively storms, fires, floods and heat cost $306 billion and claimed over 300 lives in the U.S. in 2017. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) reported that more than 25 million Americans were affected by natural disasters last year, almost 8 percent of the population, and the Federal government authorized more than $7 billion in disaster funds. Unfortunately, once the final numbers are tallied from the devastating effects to the Carolinas due to Hurricane Florence, 2018 may shatter last year’s figures.

Natural disasters are a threat to everyone, everywhere. However, the greater threat is not being prepared.

Even though every state in the U.S. has its risks of natural disasters, sadly, only about half of American adults are prepared. Many don’t even have a plan. Consequently, when utilities get shut down and the grocery store shelves are empty, they’re left with little to do but panic.

Although we can’t stop a disaster from happening, we can be prepared for it. Being prepared not only keeps you from needing immediate help from first responders who may not be able to reach you, it also reduces the impact of an emergency on your life as well as the lives of your loved ones.

Your first defense is knowledge. You need to know the types of natural disasters that could occur where you live – floods, tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, volcanoes, wildfires, and/or extreme cold and heat. By knowing this, you can better prepare for the specific risks resulting from these types of disasters.

Adequately preparing for a disaster means having the resources – food, shelter, water, sanitation and first aide – to be self-sufficient (you, your family and pets) – for a minimum of three days, according to FEMA.

To meet these needs, begin by building an emergency disaster supply kit with the following basics of what you’ll need to make it through three days:

Water 

At a minimum, you will need one gallon of water per person per day. If you can, store more. Most importantly, make sure that any water you use for drinking, washing or preparing food, cleaning dishes, brushing your teeth, etc. is not contaminated. Avoid water with a bad taste or odor.

Food

Have an adequate supply of food, preferably non-perishable goods such as canned soups, meats, vegetables and powered milk, to provide each person with approximately 2,000 calories a day.

First-Aid Supplies

Your emergency disaster first-aid kit should include more than bandages and topical creams. It should also contain syringes, splints and a suture kit to ensure you’re prepared for any medical emergency. You should also include a week’s supply of all prescription medications for each family member as well as over-the-counter medication such as ibuprofen, antihistamines and antibacterial creams. 

 

Utensils and Safety Items

Make sure to include anything you may need to prepare and eat meals. Safety supplies are also essential to your emergency kit. Make sure to include blankets, fire starters, flashlights, a multi-tool, a knife and a whistle. A NOAA weather radio will also come in handy to keep you updated on weather alerts. Keep all assistive devices and equipment fully charged and ready to go.

Important Documents 

Your emergency kit should include copies of all your important documents. This includes insurance cards (medical, house, auto and life), birth certificates, passports, social security cards, marriage licenses and driver’s licenses. You should also include your emergency disaster plan that contains the contact information for everyone in your family (your out-of-state family as well), emergency services in your area and any other vital information. You should keep all these documents in a waterproof container in your emergency kit.

Other Miscellaneous Items

Your emergency disaster kit should also contain personal care items like soap, toothpaste and shampoo. You should also include batteries of all sizes, cash (preferably small bills), a spare credit card, an extra set of car and house keys, and, if you have small children, a coloring book and crayons deserves a spot in your emergency kit.

If you have pets, make sure to have an adequate supply of food and water as well as any medications or other supplies they may require.

In addition to having your emergency disaster supply kit ready, you should have an evacuation plan. You should know the evacuation routes for your area. You should also have an emergency communications plan in place. Know how you will contact your family members if something happens and you’re separated. You should share this plan with not only your immediate family but neighbors and friends as well. 

After the Disaster 

Once the emergency is over, you will have to deal…be prepared for the aftermath as well. However, remember, the health and safety of you and your family is a priority. If medical attention is needed contact local responders or the Red Cross for assistance or get to the closest hospital or medical center.

Returning Home

If you’ve evacuated, return home only when the local government gives the okay. Once the okay has been given, proceed with caution. You should also prepare yourself and your family mentally. Even if everyone is physically okay, it can be emotionally devastating to return home and see your home and belongings destroyed.

Recovering 

With natural disasters and emergences, oftentimes come physical and financial losses. But, similar to the preparation for the event itself, you can minimize the impact of these losses with proper preparation.

Well before a disaster or emergency, contact your homeowner’s insurance company representative and have a detailed conversation with them about what’s covered and what’s not. By knowing this, you can add additional coverage for types of disasters that are most common in your area that you may not currently have.

You should also have a photographic record of all your valuable possessions – jewelry, appliances, art, electronics, etc. Having this will help you detail your losses when dealing with your insurance company as well as provide documentation for these losses come tax time.

Mental Health and Crisis Intervention 

A natural disaster or emergency can also take its toll on emotions and mental health, especially a child’s. Reach out to your family, your doctor or specialized natural disaster or emergency organizations/teams for mental health assistance.

Being prepared for a natural disaster or emergency is essential. It’s a 365-day-a-year activity. So, if you haven’t already, take charge and control now to be as prepared as possible.

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