Monthly Archives: January 2016

Decluttering your life

Similar to losing weight, quitting smoking, beginning and maintaining an exercise regime or just being a happier person, decluttering your life is no easy feat. Decluttering, especially if you tend to be a collector, can seem like a daunting, insurmountable task. Due to this mindset, the best-intentioned decluttering plan is often short-lived.

Decluttering your life, like eating an elephant, is best-accomplished one bite at a time. You’ll have a higher rate of success by taking things one small step at a time. After all, clutter, like being overweight, a chain-smoker, out of shape or even a sourpuss, didn’t happen overnight.

The good…great news is, by taking that first, often painful decluttering step, and continuing on with little steps, you’ll soon see big improvements in your living and working space as well as your life.

Here are some steps to get you started:

Your Home

Take a few minutes today to sort through a pile…or declutter a shelf, table or countertop. Pick up the first item in the pile and ask yourself, “Do I really need this…love it…or use it regularly?” If the answer is no, put it into one of four piles – “Donate,” “Recycle,” “Give Away” or “Toss.” If the answer is yes, put it in a “Keep” pile.

When you’ve had enough decluttering for the day (10-20 minutes is a good start), separately bag or box up the no piles and put them in your trunk to disseminate the next time you’re out. Then, gather up the items in your yes or “Keep” pile and find a permanent home for them.

If you’re on the fence about some items, use a “Maybe” box. Put today’s date on it and a six-month reminder on your calendar. If, in six months, you haven’t used it, you probably don’t need it and should put it in one of your no piles.

Organizing your family photos can be one of the most time-consuming decluttering tasks. If you haven’t had the time to put your photos in album or scrapbook, it’s okay to stop pretending you will someday. Group your photos by subject – a family reunion, a trip to Europe, etc. – and store them in a clear shoebox, labeled and dated.

Don’t move onto another room or space until you’ve completed the current one. This may take several days, especially if you’re cleaning out closets and drawers/cabinets. Remember, take it slowly, and relish in your small accomplishments (your newly decluttered space), or you’ll think the task is too difficult and won’t want to continue.

Your Work Area

Decluttering your workspace is essential to productivity and focus.

Begin with your desk. Clear everything off the top of your desk and assemble it in piles on the floor. This provides the perfect occasion to clean and wipe down your desk. Once you’ve done this, begin sorting through the piles. Similar to decluttering your home, determine which items are needed and can be filed or put away, and which aren’t and can be delegated or tossed.

Once you’ve accomplished this…and have had time to bask in the enjoyment of a clean and organized desk, move onto the drawers, shelves and/or cabinets.

The goal of this project is to designate a permanent place for every item you’ve decided to keep and maintain a clean, organized desktop. To accomplish this, have an inbox for all incoming papers and sort through it daily to determine what should be filed or put away, delegated or tossed. This simple daily task will help you stay on top of the clutter. In addition, develop a filing system for ongoing or currently in-process projects.

At the end of your workday, the only items that should remain on your desk are your computer, your inbox, and maybe a special photo or memento, and any documents you are working on at the moment.

In addition to decluttering your workspace, you should also declutter your computer. Weed out the files and programs on your computer that you don’t need. Clean up your desktop. These icons not only slow down your computer, but they also create visual clutter.

Your Information

In today’s digital world, there are so many different ways that information creeps into our lives. Having too much information at our fingertips can be overwhelming/stressful as well as a big timewaster. Set limits on the amount of information you receive and read each day. Get rid of things from your RSS feed. Reduce your magazine and newspaper subscriptions as well as your consumption of news and television. Instead of letting information take over your life, including the information your friends share with you via social media, control how and when you receive information by limiting the sources and what you read.

Your Commitments

Declutter your day by reducing your commitments, personal and work-related. Start by making a list of the day’s commitments. Prioritize these commitments, the things that are most important to you and your day, and say “no” to or put off the non-essential things for another day. Become ruthless about saying “no” to new commitments…guard your personal and professional time.

Maintaining Order

Once you’ve successfully decluttered, whether it’s in one area or all the areas mentioned above, clutter will always find a way of creeping back into your life. You must be vigilant and stay on top of it…so it doesn’t get out of hand again.

Set up a system to keep clutter in check. The most critical step in this system is not putting off today what you’d rather to do tomorrow. Deal with it immediately.

By devoting a little of your time to eliminating clutter and maintaining a fairly clutter-free existence, you’ll reap the rewards – a pleasing living and working environment and a more organized, productive and stress-free life.

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