Creating a Memorable Staycation

Who’s ready for a vacation? After the past several months, the better question is, who isn’t? Many families, however, are putting their travel plans on hold until the coronavirus outbreak subsides and their financial situations stabilize. But, you can still take a break from the stress and tension of everything going on around you and recharge and rejuvenate, all while creating lasting memories with your family, with an affordable staycation.

The key to the perfect staycation is to research, plan and prepare for it like you would for your traditional, out-of-town vacation.

Here are few research ideas and planning ahead tips to help you make the most of your staycation:

  1. First and foremost, your staycation, like a traditional vacation, requires you to take the time off work, blocking off your schedule just like you would if you were leaving town.

  • Make a list of your favorite local restaurants that deliver and plan a few staycation, take out dinners.

  • Load up your DVR or WatchList queue – Catch up on a series you’ve wanted to watch or download a marathon of your favorite movies. Have them teed up in your watch list for easy access and don’t forget to have plenty of popcorn and candy on hand!

  • Check out books at your local library or download a good read on your Kindle or Nook.  Your staycation is the perfect time to relax on the couch or in the backyard hammock and immerse yourself in a great novel.

  • Download some recipes you’ve been interested in trying out and add the necessary ingredients to your staycation, grocery shopping list.

  • Set up an area in the backyard for a bonfire. Make sure to have a generous supply of seasoned wood and kindling on hand, and don’t forget to add graham crackers, marshmallows and chocolate bars to your shopping list for those yummy, campfire s’mores.

  • Pull out your favorite board games and a deck of playing cards. Add your favorite snacks and drinks to the grocery list and be ready for a marathon board or card game tournament night. Get your competitive family spirit going by keeping score and offering the winner a gift card to his or her favorite store for the prize.

  • Visit the websites of places of interest and see what they have to offer virtually. Numerous museums, art galleries, zoos and parks offer very inexpensive or free ways to take virtual tours. In addition, sites like Google Arts & Culture offer the opportunity to explore cultural institutions across the globe like the British Museum in London, the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam and the Guggenheim in New York City for free.

  • Get the supplies needed for a water park in your backyard. Sprinklers, slip and slides and buckets of water balloons will create some great hot weather fun for the whole family. Buy or build your own cornhole board game for some additional backyard fun.

  1. Plan to truly unplug and disconnect. Your staycation is for you and your family so do your part to make it a real vacation. Set up an out-of-office email response, silence your phone, turn off your computer and let your colleagues know not to bother you unless it’s extremely urgent.

  1. Get the chores done before you begin your staycation. Pay your bills and do the laundry, house cleaning and lawn work, and stock up on the groceries and essentials for your staycation activities.

  1.  Build excitement for your staycation. Like a traditional vacation, put the dates on the calendar and begin counting down to your staycation. Print out a staycation calendar and as you and your family decide on your plans/activities, mark them on your calendar.

These are just a few ideas to get you started. Get your family together and add your own creative, out-of-the-box activities to make this is a fun and memorable family staycation!

June: A Celebration of the Men in Your Life

The month of June celebrates the men in your life. Not only is the third Sunday set aside to honor dads, but the entire month of June is dedicated to taking stock of the health of the men in your life as well.

Men’s Health Month, a national observance anchored by a Congressional health education program and recognized by the White House and the official symbol, a blue ribbon, is an annual observance to raise awareness of preventable health problems and encourage early detection and treatment of diseases including cancer, heart disease and depression. Health fairs and other health education and outreached activities will be held across the country to encourage men to take care of their bodies by eating healthy, exercising and working to prevent disease.

According to menshealth.org, men, on average, die almost five years earlier than women. This is due, in part, to the fact that men are more reluctant to go to the doctor. Studies indicate that women tend to go to the doctor twice as much as men. Consequently, Men’s Health Month provides the perfect opportunity to motivate, promote and support healthy habits in the men in your life.  Here are a few ways you can do this:

Encourage him to get a physical – Most of the contributors to men, on average, having a shorter lifespan than women are preventable. This prevention begins with a physical with a primary care provider. This establishes baselines for factors such as blood pressure, cholesterol, weight and PSA (a screening test for prostate cancer risk). These visits should continue annually to monitor how these factors change over time, consequently, catching potentially dangerous conditions early, while they’re still treatable.

Encourage him to exercise – The benefits to physical activity on our health, especially as we age, are extensive. However, most of us are not motivated to exercise on our own. So, make it a partnership…find fun ways to get fit together. Join a gym, sign up for personal training or make walks part of your regular routine. Adults need about 2.5 hours of physical activity each week.

Encourage him to eat healthy – Help him make healthy eating choices by including a variety of fruits, vegetables and lean meats in your diet. Limit foods and drinks that are high in calories, fat, sugar, salt and alcohol.

Encourage him (if he does) to quit smoking – Set the example for him by choosing not to smoke and encourage him to quit. Quitting smoking has immediate and long-term benefits such as lowering the risk for different types of cancer as well as other cardiovascular and lung diseases.

Encourage him to recognize and reduce stress in his life – Physical and emotional illness are often a byproduct of long-term stress. Encourage him to learn how to manage stress in his life through finding support, eating healthy, exercising regularly and avoiding alcohol and drugs.

Encourage him to seek help for depression – Depression is one of the leading causes of disease or injury for both men and women worldwide. Learn to recognize the signs, which include persistent sadness, grumpiness, feelings of hopelessness, fatigue and decreased energy, and thoughts of suicide, and how you can help the men in your life. If someone in your life is in crisis, seek help immediately by:

  • Calling 911
  • Visiting your local ER or healthcare provider
  • Calling the toll-free, 24-hour National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255); TTY: 1-800-799-4TTY (4889) to talk to a trained counselor.

And lastly,

Let him know you care – Men often disregard their own health because they’re too preoccupied with taking care of everyone else. So, remind him how much he’s loved and how important he is to you and other family members, and that you want and need him to stay alive and healthy as long as possible.

Life After Covid-19 – Scenarios of Economic Recovery

As the cases of Covid-19 begin to level off, many states are cautiously reopening and beginning to loosen their social distancing restrictions in hopes of jumpstarting their economy.

The coronavirus pandemic has devastated the U.S. and world economy, plummeting economic activity and causing soaring unemployment rates. Social distancing policies designed to slow the spread of the disease have resulted in an economic decline that rivals the Great Depression.

So, what can we expect over the next several months? Will the economic recovery be as painful as the coronavirus-linked lockdowns or will there be a bounceback or possibly a scenario in between these extremes?

Currently, economic analysts are debating the following scenarios of recovery:

The “Z-Shaped” Recovery – This most optimistic scenario predicts that the post-pandemic economy bounces back above the pre-pandemic baseline due to pent-up demand, creating a temporary economic boom. In other words, once the risk of the pandemic passes, we will come out in full force, shopping and dining and taking those trips we postponed.

The “V-Shaped” Recovery – The next best recovery scenario suggests that although the economy permanently loses the production that would have occurred absent the pandemic, it will quickly return to its pre-pandemic baseline once social distancing restrictions have been lifted. In other words, the economy will go back to its pre-virus state.

The “W-Shaped” Recovery – This double-dip scenario suggests that there will be a surge in COVID-19 cases after the initial re-openings, causing another round of closures, causing another downturn in the economy prior to a recovery.

The “U-Shaped” Recovery – This scenario suggests that GDP remains low for some time, possibly more than a couple of quarters after the lockdowns have been lifted, resulting in the economy recovering, returning to its baseline slowly.

The “Swoosh-Shaped” Recovery – Borrowed from Nike’s logo, this scenario suggests that after a sharp downturn the economy will gradually bounce back as restrictions are eased and consumers, businesses and state and local governments are willing to spend. Many economists believe this or the U-Shaped recoveries are the likeliest scenarios.

The “L-Shaped” Recovery – This most pessimistic scenario suggests that the pandemic has a permanent affect on GDP, causing growth to continue to decline and not recover for some time. This is pretty much what the Great Depression recovery looked like. Most economists believe this scenario is unlikely unless the number of global coronavirus cases continue to rise, forcing more lockdowns.

The common thread that runs through these various scenarios is that they contain some variation of the tradeoff between the physical health response and economic response. As the economy reopens, measures will still be in place that will curtail economic activity to some degree – businesses will have to space workers and customers further apart, travel will be less common, restaurants will be serving fewer customers at a time, and activities involving large crowds will remain off limits for possibly a long time. Many people will be reluctant to return to life as it was prior to the pandemic, settling into a new “normal.”

Although economists have different recovery theories, they seem to be in agreement that the economy isn’t going to rebound overnight. The key question, however, is whether the damage to our economy will be long lasting.

Maintaining Your Mental Health During the COVID-19 Crisis

As you navigate this alien world of surgical masks in the grocery stores, the shortage of everyday household supplies, the overcrowding in our healthcare facilities and the bombardment of news that our world has become a dangerous place to live, you may be beginning to feel overwhelmed and anxious. The novel coronavirus outbreak has created unprecedented levels of anxiety for most of us – for some who are actually battling the virus, but for the vast majority who are facing the unknown, the disruption of their everyday routine, loss of employment and serious financial concerns.

This is unchartered territory for most of us, and it is frightening! For many people, the fear of the unknown and the incessant doom and gloom headlines make it all too easy to spiral into overwhelming dread and panic. But, there are many things you can do to self-care – manage your anxiety and fears – during this unique crisis.

Take Care of Yourself First – Like the announcement we hear each time we get on an airplane, “In case of a cabin pressure emergency, put your own mask on first before assisting others.” This is a metaphor for life. You can’t help others for very long if you don’t take care of yourself first.

Keep a Routine – Even if you’re stuck at home, try to maintain your normal routine by sticking to your regular sleep, meal, and school or work schedule.

Eat Well – Proper eating is one defense against most diseases. Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables. Avoid eating out of boredom or anxiety, eliminate or reduce alcohol consumption and other intoxicants and stay well hydrated.

Exercise – Although we can’t hit the gyms like we used to, there are many safe alternatives you can do in the comfort and safety of your home. If you don’t have any exercise videos, use YouTube and Instagram to help you find ways to stay fit or just take long walks.

Limit News Intake – Limit your media consumption to only the information you need to know to stay safe…then turn it off! This advice goes for financial information as well. Watching the stock market go up and down (mostly down) all day can have a negative impact on your mental wellbeing.

Have Fun – Enjoy the extra time you have with your family by talking…and laughing, playing board games, cards, putting together puzzles and cooking.

Connect – Take this downtime to reach out to those you care about, making sure they are staying safe and letting them know how important they are to you. Take advantage of the many technical (FaceTime) and social media resources to stay connected during this time of social isolation.

Engage in Positive Activities – Read a good book, listen to uplifting music, watch the sunrise or sunset, get out in nature, practice yoga or meditate. Limit your interactions with negative people. Remember emotions are contagious and right now fear is rampant.

You can also counteract distress over the loss of control by straightening up what you can. This is a great time to clean and organize your home or to attack a home improvement project you’ve been meaning to get to.

Reflect – The sudden halt in our daily lives, caused by this unprecedented crisis, has forced us to sit still. We can spend this time by being overwhelmed with negative thoughts and a sense of despair or we can use these quiet moments to reflect on the positive changes we want to make in our lives when this pause button is removed. Try to think about the activities in your life you’ve come to realize are important and you want to resume, start making a mental list of the ones you don’t, and above all, focus on the many blessings you have.

The national Disaster Distress Helpline is available to anyone experiencing emotional distress related to COVID-19. Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 to speak to a counselor.

February: American Heart Health Month

With Valentine’s Day less than two weeks away, many of us view February as the month of love. However, February is also designated as American Heart Health Month. In addition, on the first Friday of every February (this year is February 7th), the nation comes together, donning the color red from coast to coast, for National Wear Red Day, celebrating one common goal: the eradication of heart disease and stroke.

American Heart Health Month is a federally designated event that was proclaimed by President Lyndon B. Johnson on December 30, 1963 to encourage Americans to join the battle against heart disease. This annual, month-long celebration helps remind Americans to focus on their heart and encourages their involvement with family and friends, and within their communities.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death of Americans. According to the American Heart Association, approximately 2,200 people die each day from heart disease. In addition, about 1.3 million adults have high blood pressure and 6.5 million are living with heart failure.

Heart disease is being diagnosed in younger adults more and more often. High rates of obesity and high blood pressure among young people are putting them at risk of heart-related diseases at an earlier age. Although genetic factors play a role in heart-related conditions, nearly 80 percent of cardiovascular diseases may be preventable with education and lifestyle changes.

How to Take Control of Your Heart Health

Don’t Smoke – Smoking is the most preventable cause of premature death in the United States. Smokers have a higher risk of developing many chronic disorders including atherosclerosis and a buildup of fatty substances in the arteries. So, if you don’t smoke, don’t start. If you do smoke, learn how to quit – there are numerous helpful resources out there.

Managing Your Health – Work with your health professionals to manage your weight, blood pressure and blood sugar levels. All of these factors play a significant role in maintaining a healthy heart.

Stay Physically Active – Heart pumping physical activity helps prevent cardiovascular disease as well as improves your overall mental and physical health.

The American Heart Association recommends five 30-minute exercise sessions each week. If this seems a little daunting, break these sessions up into two or three 10-15 minute segments throughout the day. Walking, jogging, biking and swimming are great forms of cardiovascular exercise. The American Heart Association also recommends adding moderate to high-intensity strength training into your sessions to improve daily functional movements and decrease the chance of injury.

Make Heart-Healthy Eating Choices – A diet low in trans-fat, saturated fat, added sugar and sodium is essential to a healthy heart and lifestyle. Aim to fill at least half of your plate with vegetables and fruit. Salmon, nuts, berries and oats are just a few of the heart “superfoods,” that may help reduce the risk of atherosclerosis. As a special treat, add dark chocolate, in moderation, to the list – it’s good for the heart and satisfies the sweet tooth.

Reduce Stress – Stress increases cortisol, a steroid hormone, which can lead to weight gain, a key risk factor in heart disease. Stress can also lead to other unhealthy habits including overeating and excessive alcohol consumption. Stress can also increase the risk of anxiety and depression.

Get Plenty of Rest – Many Americans today are sleep deprived. Sleep restores the body, helps decrease stress and anxiety and increases overall happiness.

With all this said, “get your red on” and make this February the beginning of healthy habits and lifestyle changes. Your heart will thank you!

The History of New Year’s

Now that you’ve rung in 2020 with a glass or two of the bubbly and are most likely already rehashing the long list of resolutions you’ve made, and probably not kept, over the last decade, vowing to make a better effort this year, I thought I’d share some New Year’s history facts you probably don’t know. I’m sure you’ll find, like I did, that there’s a fascinating and lengthy history behind this widely celebrated holiday.

Many countries around the world celebrate the beginning of the new year. However, celebrating New Year’s is not new. Celebrations of the new calendar year have been around for thousands of years, dating back to ancient Babylon in 2,000 B.C. The Mesopotamians marked the beginning of the new year by the first new moon after the vernal equinox, which took place sometime in late March. This was celebrated with a huge 11-day festival called Akitu. The festival involved a different ritual every day, celebrating the mythical victory of the sky god Marduk over the sea goddess Tiamat. This celebration also included the crowning of a new king or allowing the current ruler to continue his reign. According to the history books, this was the festival of all festivals and would put our present day New Year’s celebration to shame.

The Roman’s celebration of the new year also originally corresponded with the vernal equinox. Their early calendar, which according to tradition, was created in the eighth century B.C. by Romulus, the founder of Rome, consisted of 10 months (304 days), with each new year beginning at the vernal equinox. However, over the centuries, this calendar fell out of synch with the sun. Consequently, in 46 B.C., with the consultation of the most prominent astronomers and mathematicians of the time, Julius Caesar introduced the Julian calendar. This was a solar-based calendar, instituting January 1st as the first day of the year. Caesar chose this day to honor the month’s namesake Janus, the Roman god of change and beginnings. This calendar resembles the modern Gregorian calendar that most countries around the world use today.

By the middle ages, medieval Europe considered the January 1st celebrations of the new year pagan and unchristian-like. Consequently, in 567 A.D. the Council of Tours replaced the January 1st date with days carrying more religious significance, such as December 25th or March 25th.

In 1582, Pope Gregory XII re-established January 1st as New Year’s Day, after the reform of the Gregorian calendar. Interestingly, although most Catholic countries immediately adopted this calendar, Protestant countries, like Britain and their American colonies, continued celebrating their new year in March until 1752.

So, now that I’ve astonished you with all these fascinating tidbits of New Year’s history, it’s time to begin or get back to the task at hand – formulating this year’s new and improved (LOL) list of New Year’s resolutions!

From our Intracoastal family to yours, here’s to a happy, healthy and prosperous 2020…and sticking to your resolutions!

‘Tis the Season…Not to Go Broke!

The season of giving is upon us! But, before you head out
the door to join the hustle and bustle at your local mall or begin filling your
shopping cart at your favorite online shopping sites, here are a few tips to keep
you from overspending and going into debt this holiday season.

Develop a holiday
shopping budget…and stick to it!

The first and most important thing you need to do is to
develop a realistic and reasonable holiday budget.  This will save you from impulse buying and
overspending.

If you haven’t saved already, look at your current household
budget and determine how much money you can allocate each week (paycheck) to
holiday spending. This includes gifts, food (items you only purchase during the
holiday season), decorations and travel. There may be items on your current
household budget you can eliminate until after the holidays (e.g. your daily
latte) and/or you could pick up a part-time holiday job to save even more
money.

Look for deals

Start browsing for people on your list, looking for the best
deals.  Beware…the best prices are not
necessarily found on Black Friday or Cyber Monday. These days typically offer
good deals on items like electronics, apparel and beauty products. You will
usually find better deals on toys and outerwear later in December.

Many stores will negotiate their prices to meet competitors
so you will buy from them. Doing your homework, comparing prices, before you
hit the big box stores will put you in a better negotiating position.

Use your credit cards
wisely

Using your credit cards for your holiday purchases may save
you money, especially if you utilize your card member perks/rewards, but only
if you’re able to pay off the monthly balance. The interest you will have to
pay if you don’t far outweighs the value of the card’s rewards.

Save money on
purchases with discounted gift cards

Sites like GiftCardGranny or CardPool sell discounted gift
cards. You can use them to make in-store purchases and save on whatever you
buy. If you couple the discounted gift card with a coupon, you’ll really save
money on your purchase.

Don’t go overboard
buying holiday attire

You don’t need a new outfit for every holiday function. Make
a few solid pieces unique by accessorizing. That same little black dress will
have a whole new look with different jewelry and shoes or a colorful scarf or a
dressy sweater or jacket. Be creative!

Hold off on self-purchases
until after the holidays

Many people like to buy that special something for
themselves during the holiday season. But, resisting this temptation will give
you more wiggle room in your holiday budget. Wait until after the holidays to
satisfy this urge by using gift cards you may have received. You will also reap
the benefits of the post-holiday sales.

DIY

People love receiving homemade gifts. So, bring out your
inner Martha Stewart and make your money go even further. Come up with more
sentimental gifts that won’t break the bank.

When it’s all said and done, consider your long-term
financial goals. Is it worth depleting your savings or racking up high-interest
debt for one day? Think about the true meaning of the holiday season…the
special time spent with friends and loved ones.

Have an open and honest conversation about your budget with
your family prior to the holidays. Most likely, they have been stressing about
overspending too.

From our Intracoastal Bank family to yours, have a safe and
blessed holiday season!

Remembering Jane

It’s hard to believe the holiday season is just around the corner. Where did the year go? As we, the Intracoastal Bank family, happily anticipate the first holiday of this wondrous season, Thanksgiving, we are also mourning the loss of a longtime member of our banking family, Jane Worthing. Jane, who was 57, passed away recently after a two-year battle with ovarian cancer.

Jane was born in Augusta, Maine. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Spanish from the University of Massachusetts in Amherst. Prior to her 8 ½ -year tenure with Intracoastal Bank, as our Secrecy Act Officer, handling compliance issues and legal requests, and monitoring accounts for fraud issues, Jane worked for the Bank of New York.

Jane will be greatly missed by her Intracoastal Bank family as well as all the customers she assisted during her time with us. Jane was considered as one of the most selfless people – always going above and beyond to help others – by both her coworkers and managers.

When Jane wasn’t giving of herself through her duties at the bank, she spent her time traveling, especially internationally, reading and hanging out with her two, much cherished cats. Jane is survived by her parents, a brother and sister-in-law and a niece.

Ovarian cancer, which begins in the ovaries or the fallopian tubes, has been dubbed “the silent killer” because of its low survival rate (an overall 5-year survival rate of 47 percent). Also labeled as the “whispering disease” because no specific test diagnoses it, ovarian cancer’s prognosis is unfavorable due to the delay in detecting it.

The American Cancer Society estimates for ovarian cancer in the U.S. for 2019 are:

• About 22,530 women will receive a new diagnosis of ovarian cancer.
• About 13,980 women will die from ovarian cancer.

Ovarian cancer ranks fifth in cancer deaths among women and accounts for more deaths than any other cancer of the reproductive system. Ovarian cancer mostly develops in older women, about 50 percent diagnosed at age 63 or older, and is most common in white women.

Sadly, our Jane is one of these statistics.

So, this year, as our Intracoastal family sits around the Thanksgiving table, we’ll be counting our many blessings, which include our health, family, friends, and the wonderful customers we continue to serve in our community. We will also take a quiet moment to fondly remember those who are no longer with us, including our Jane.

From all of us at Intracoastal Bank, may you and your family have a safe and blessed Thanksgiving holiday!

Celebrate Fall

Fall has always been my favorite season. The time when everything bursts with its last beauty, as if nature had been saving up all year for the grand finale.  Lauren Destefano

Although it may not feel like fall in the Sunshine State, there
are still many wonderful ways to celebrate the season. From activities like apple
picking and attempting a corn maze to attending the many festivals around the
state, fall presents lots of fun activities for the whole family.

Here are a few fun ideas sure to make long-lasting memories:

  1. Go Apple
    Picking
    – Apple picking is a great way to get fresh produce and enjoy the
    beautiful fall weather as well as a wonderful learning opportunity for young kids.
    You can show them how to properly pick apples from the tree and give them the
    chance to try different varieties of apples to determine which ones they like
    best. Google Florida U-Pick Apple Orchards for a list of
    orchards near you.
  2. Visit
    a Pumpkin Patch
    – One very popular family fall activity is visiting a
    pumpkin patch. Like apple farms, pumpkin patches typically have other fun
    activities as well like hay rides and maybe even a petting zoo. Google Florida Pumpkin Patches for one near
    you.
  3. Attempt
    a Corn Maze
    This is a great
    family activity because it gives your family the opportunity to work together,
    deciding which ways you should go. Some mazes can be difficult, and it provides
    a great feeling of achievement when you make it to the end. Google Florida Corn Mazes for one near you.
  4. Bake
    a Pie
    – The holiday season is just around the corner, so fall is the
    perfect time to try your hand at making a pie. There’s some work involved in
    making a pie from scratch so make it a family affair. Find a great apple and/or
    pumpkin pie recipe and start baking and creating fun family memories!
  5. Make
    Caramel Apples and Roast Pumpkin Seeds

    This a wonderful and delicious way to make use of the apples you’ve picked
    from your apple orchard trip and pumpkin you’ve brought back from your pumpkin
    patch visit.
  6. Collect
    Leaves and Acorns and Do a Fall Craft
    –The colorful leaves and acorns that drop from the trees are one of the best
    things about fall. They are great for DIY projects and decorating your home.
  7. Enjoy a
    Fall Festival
    – What Florida lacks in colorful foliage, it more than makes
    up for in fun and entertaining fall festivals. 

North Central Florida Peanut Festival – Fun, food, games,
entertainment as well as a competition for girls and boys for Little Peanut
King and Queen. October 5 at Heritage Park in Williston.

Winter Park Autumn Art Festival – Artworks by over a hundred
artists as well as musical entertainment, food and children’s activities.
October 12 to 13 at Central Park, located along Park Avenue in downtown Winter
Park.

Rattlesnake Music Festival – Features snake shows, entertainment,
food, arts and crafts…and even gopher races. October 18 to 20 at the Pasco
County Fairgrounds.

Fantasy Fest in Key West – Non-stop activities including parades,
masquerades, street parties and more. October 18 to 27.

McIntosh 1890’s Festival – Residents dressed in 1890’s attire and
Victorian and Florida cracker-style homes surrounded by century-old oak trees
make this the perfect backdrop for going back in time. This festival also
includes arts and craft booths as well as delicacies from many food concession
stands. October 26 along Highway 441 between Gainesville and Ocala.

Florida Seafood Festival in Apalachicola – Sample delicious seafood
and enjoy arts and craft exhibits and fish-related events and displays. November
1 to 2 in Battery Park in downtown Apalachicola.

Micanopy Fall Harvest Festival – Live music, an auction and over
200 displays of works from local and southeast artists. November 2 to 3, just
off Highway 441, 12 miles south of Gainesville

Riverhawk Music Festival – Live entertainment on three stages,
all-day kids programs, song contests, great food and craft brews, and camping
in the woods. November 7 to 10 at the Sertoma Youth Ranch in Brooksville.

Epcot International Food & Wine Festival – Sample world-class
foods and wines. Enjoy live music, cooking events as well as meet and greets
with celebrity chefs. August 29 to November 23 at Epcot World Showcase.

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