cheryl tanenbaum

Last-minute Ways to Save for Summer Vacation

Summer is just around the corner and most of us have begun thinking about and possibly are already planning for our summer family vacations.

In an ideal world, we’d already have a fully funded vacation savings account to pay for our annual family getaway. However, the reality is that most of us wait until the last minute to begin planning and paying for our summer vacation.

So, here are a few fast track tips to help you save for your summer trip:

1. Start with a budget – discuss and determine upfront how much you want to spend on your family vacation. Have a specific figure in mind. This should include plane tickets or gas if you’re driving, hotel prices and an estimate of cost for meals, admission tickets for theme parks, museums, etc. Then, total it all up. If this figure sends you into a coronary arrest…just kidding…then cut back until you and your bank account are comfortable. The last thing you want to do is to go into debt for a vacation. If money is tight, consider taking a couple of weekend getaways instead of one big dream trip.

2. Prioritize now – are there some items currently in your budget that you can omit or would be willing to sacrifice now for a fun vacation later? Can you downgrade a plan, such as your TV cable or satellite plan or go out to eat less? A typical family with kids younger than 6 spends an average of $240 each month on restaurant meals, according to the National Restaurant Association.

So, go through your current household expenses and cut out some nonessentials or superfluous expenses. Then take that extra money and put it away in a separate vacation savings account.

3. Have a garage sale – a garage sale is a great way to earn some vacation cash quickly. Run an ad in the local paper to attract a crowd and post easy-to-read signs around your neighborhood. Get the entire family involved in this – make this a fun family affair. Have the kids go through their rooms, toy boxes, etc. and tell them whatever proceeds are collected from their items will be put towards their souvenirs. This is also a fun spring-cleaning project. It’s a win-win.

4. Use your tax refund now – if you typically get a sizeable income tax refund from the IRS every year, you are probably having too much money withheld from your paycheck. If this is the case, fill out a new W-4 form and adjust your withholding so that it’s fairly close to what you owe each year. Then begin transferring that extra money into your dedicated vacation savings account. If you still get a refund, stash that away as well.

5. Let your credit cards help pay for your vacation – in the months prior to your vacation, use your credit cards with reward points for everything your normally pay for with cash, debit card or check. Use these accumulated points towards plane tickets, hotels, rental cars and gift cards for restaurants. But, make sure to pay off the balance on your card in full every month or you’re defeating the purpose of a debt-free vacation.

6. Get everyone involved in the saving excitement – chart your savings with a graph, much like you see with fundraisers, on a large poster board. Track your weekly and monthly progress with colorful markers. You can even reward yourself and your family for reaching certain goals, e.g. go out for ice cream when you’ve reach a savings milestone.

In a nutshell, make a realistic plan for your family summer vacation, save for your plan and make the process a fun family affair! By doing this, you will be creating special memories instead of debt.

Tax Season: A perfect time to think about an IRA

With tax day looming, it’s a great time to review your current retirement savings strategies and make any changes that are necessary in an effort to keep your plan on track for long-term financial security. This time of year is also a perfect time to start an IRA if you haven’t done so already.

The IRS allows contributions to an IRA up to April 15, 2014 for the 2013 tax year.

There are two types of IRAs available: a traditional IRA and a Roth IRA. The principal difference between the two is the tax treatment of contributions and distributions or withdrawals.

The traditional IRA may allow a tax deduction based on your contribution, depending on your income level. Earnings on this type of account compound on a tax-deferred basis. In other words, distributions are taxable at the time of withdrawal at the then-current income tax rates.

The Roth IRA doesn’t allow a deduction for contributions. However, earnings and qualified withdrawals are tax-free.

When deciding whether a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA is the right choice for you, you need to weigh the immediate benefit of the tax deduction and earnings that compound on a tax-deferred basis against tax-free distributions in retirement.

If you need the tax deduction to help lower your tax bill this year – and you qualify for it – then you may want to opt for the traditional IRA.

To qualify for the full annual IRA deduction in 2013, you must either: 1. Not be eligible to participate in a company retirement plan, or 2. If you are eligible, you must have an adjusted gross income of $59,000 or less for singles, or $95,000 or less for married couples filing jointly. If you are not eligible for a company plan but your spouse is, your traditional IRA contribution is fully deductible as long as your combined gross income does not exceed $178,000.

If you are covered by a retirement plan at work, your 2013 deduction will be reduced if your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) is:

Between $95,000 and $115,000 for a married couple filing a joint return for the 2013 tax year.
Between $59,000 and $69,000 for a single individual or head of the household for the 2013 tax year.

You must also consider the tax bracket you think you will be at retirement. If you expect your tax bracket to drop considerably and you qualify for the deduction, the traditional IRA may be the better choice.

If, based on the scenarios above, you don’t qualify for the deduction and/or you expect that your tax bracket will not be significantly lower; a Roth IRA may be the better option.

You should maximize your IRS allowable contributions if financially possible. The maximum is $5,500 per individual, plus an additional $1,000 annually if you are aged 50 and older for 2013. Note, those amounts are per individual not per IRA.

Not everyone can afford to maximize his/her annual IRA contribution, especially if you are already contributing to an employer retirement plan. If your workplace plan offers an employer’s matching contribution, then this “free” money may be more of an incentive to than the annual IRA deduction. If this is the case, it may make more sense to maximize the employer matched plan first and then try to maximize your contributions to your IRA.

The important takeaway from this information is that you shouldn’t hesitate to use the remaining time between now and April 15 to contribute or start an IRA. The ability for you to live comfortably in retirement depends on it.

Note: The above article is intended to provide generalized financial information for educational purposes only. It is not intended to give personalized tax, investment, legal or other business or professional advice. Before taking any action, you should always seek the assistance of a professional.

Awareness is Your Best Defense

With the growth of e-commerce, consumer online presence and email communication, scammers have also adapted to leverage this medium to con people into providing personal and financial information. One of the most common mechanisms is “phishing.”

Phishing is a fraudulent attempt to steal information, such as usernames, passwords, financial details, etc. by masquerading as a trustworthy entity. Some examples of this would include someone pretending to be social media website, a bank site, an auction site, an online payment processor or an IT administrator – the most popular culprits.

Phishing is typically done through email. The email has the look and feel of the legitimate sender. Phishing emails almost always instruct the recipient to click on a link that is contained in the email. This is a fake link that takes you to a fake website where the scammer – cybercriminal gathers your personal information.

>What to look for in a phishing email:

>Generic greetings.

>Forged links.

>Requests for personal information.

>A Sense of urgency – making the recipient believe that something has happened that requires their immediate attention.

>Incorrect spelling and bad grammar.

>Links in email.

>Threats – telling you that your security has been compromised and that you must act immediately to correct it.

>Spoofing websites or companies – scam artists use graphics in the email that appear to be connected with legitimate websites, taking you to phony sites or legitimate-looking pop-up windows. They also use web addresses that resemble names of well-known companies but are slightly altered.

Phishing is big business. As the world gets ready for the XXII Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia, so are the professional scammers. On the heels of the recent payments breach at Target Corp., cybercriminals have already begun targeting the customers affected by the breach, sending fraudulent emails, pretending to act on Target’s behalf, attempting to get personal information.

Quite unfortunately, in a digital world, the safest practice is to trust no one. The Internet is a wonderful too. But we must use it wisely – think before you click and keep in mind:

>No reputable company or organization will ask for your confidential information via email.

>Never click on a link in an email that asks you to give your personal information.

>Never reply to a popup message to provide information.

>Review you accounts (banking, credit cards, etc.) regularly.

>Always check the authenticity of the website.

>Never provide personal or confidential information to “http” links. Look for “https” links and the SSL lock symbol in the browser.

If you suspect that you have received a phishing email, contact the real company and report it to antiphishing.com, the Federal Trade Commission at spam@uce.com or the Internet Fraud Complaint Center of the FBI website.

Getting Your Fiscal House in Order in 2014

Getting Your Fiscal House in Order in 2014

By now, most of you diehard “resolutionists” have committed your 2014 goals to paper. You are full of confidence or at least a hopeful expectation that this year will be the year you really get your life in order. You’ve vowed not to repeat past mistakes and are ready to take the bull, the new year, by the horns.

Before the year gets away from you, as they always seem to do, and you find some of your goals falling by the wayside, again, as they always seem to do, you may want to make sure you get your fiscal house in order first. After all, most people’s resolutions consistently revolve around two things: health and money.

Even the federal government has a New Year’s Resolutions site with links of references to help you stay on track. Not too surprisingly, three of the 13 most popular resolutions are money focused – getting a job, saving money and managing debt.

So before you get caught up in life and your best New Year’s intentions fade away with the glitter of the holiday season, consider the following financial checklist for the new year.

Meet with a financial advisor. If you haven’t had a discussion with a financial advisor in some time, or ever, now is the time to do so. It’s never too early or too late to begin planning for your future/retirement. If you already have a financial advisor it is a good idea to meet with him or her at least once a year to monitor your progress and evaluate your plan.

Look at your taxes. If you are one of the many April 15 procrastinators this could be the year to change that. While you are waiting on your W-2s, 1099s, etc., you can begin getting your receipts in order and/or schedule an appointment with your tax preparer. Why not take the stress off tax season this year and get your taxes done early, especially if you are getting a refund. Please note that the earliest day the IRS will be processing 2013 individual tax returns this year is Jan. 31. This date is slightly later than usual due to the government shutdown last fall.

Develop or review your budget. If you haven’t created a budget, create one, or if you haven’t looked at your budget in some time, it’s time to update it. Things change (having a baby, elimination of a debt, an increase in household utilities, etc.) and consequently this affects your budget. This is also great time to re-evaluate your expenses. Cancel subscriptions or services you never use and contact companies that your do business with regularly (e.g. your cable company) to see if they can offer you a better rate. Increase deductibles on your automobile, home or medical insurance, if possible, to lower your monthly premiums.

Update your will. Like your budget, any changes, good or bad (e.g. divorce), can affect your will. If you don’t have a will, now is a good time to draft one.

Check your credit report. With identity theft on the rise, it’s very wise to monitor your credit. At annualcreditreport.com, you can get a free credit report from each of the three credit reporting agencies once a year.

Evaluate your retirement situation (ties in with ‘Meet with a financial advisor’). If you haven’t begun putting away money for retirement, there is no time better than now to start. Most financial experts will tell you to set aside 10 to 15 percent of your annual income each year for retirement. However, if you can’t manage that, put away as much as you can. Remember, saving something is better than nothing.

If you are on target with your yearly retirement contributions, it’s a great time to review your retirement accounts and strategies. If possible, according to financial experts, savers should increase their retirement contributions by 1 percent each year. You should continue this increase every year as long as you can until you are saving the maximum allowed by the IRS.

As is the case when making any major changes in your life, Rome was not built in a day. However, if you will commit to at least one of these recommendations, your 2014 finances are sure to see an improvement over 2013.

Give Thanks at Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is just around the corner! Soon we will be feverishly preparing those much-anticipated annual feasts. We will be reviewing our cherished Turkey Day recipes, preparing our grocery lists, inviting our guests and calling “dibs” on the most comfy chair in the house to watch the infamous Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.

Sadly, this holiday has lost some of its meaning over the years. It’s become an increasingly thinner slice of the celebration it was originally meant to be, sandwiched somewhere between the marketing machines of Halloween and Christmas. In many ways, Thanksgiving has become a few days of respite before the craziness of Christmas-Hanukkah-Kwanzaa unfolds.

I recently stumbled upon an extremely poignant quote by H.U. Westermayer, which I believe aptly sums up the true meaning of Thanksgiving, as it was originally intended by those who gave birth to this celebration over 390 years ago:

“The Pilgrims made seven times more graves than huts. No Americans have been more impoverished than these who, nevertheless, set aside a day of thanksgiving.”

With these sobering words in mind, let’s all take time to give thanks for our many blessings – our health, family, home, friends, job and having food on the table.

In honor of this holiday, I thought I’d give you a few creative ideas/ways to give thanks that I recently found in an article in Better Homes and Gardens. I hope you find these crafts fun to make and will make at least one of them part of your Thanksgiving tradition.

Wine Glass Tags – Print out leaf-shape pattern (you can find one on the Internet) onto fall-color papers, cut out, and punch a hole at the base of each leaf. Ask guests to pick a leaf and write a word or short phrase describing something they’re thankful for, such as “family” or “good health.” Attach leaves to the wineglass stems using lengths of gold cord or raffia.

Notes of Appreciation – For those who can’t be at your Thanksgiving table, set pen to paper to tell them they’ve made a difference in your life this year. Print these Thanksgiving designs to make lovely foldable cards for your thank-you notes.

 A Thanksgiving Tree – Stick bare branches into a pitcher filled with sand. Make ornaments from paper cutouts by punching a hole in the top of each one and tying ribbon through it. In addition to asking guests to share their thankful thoughts, ask them to sign their name and date their ornaments. Save the Thanksgiving ornaments as mementos for the coming years.

 A Journal – Craft a paper journal to record a Thanksgiving celebration. Pass the journal among guests to capture their sentiments and memories. Start your own anthology and make a journal each year. When Thanksgiving comes around again, bring out the old journals and reminisce.

Paper Placemats – Simple pieces of construction paper become expressions of thankfulness. Ask kids to write the things they are thankful for on the pieces of paper, which they can use as place mats for the Thanksgiving meal.

Gracious Giving – Extend the generous spirit beyond your gathering of friends and family. In the weeks before Thanksgiving, pick a charity to contribute to, such as a food pantry or homeless shelter. Ask guests to bring items to donate. (Be sure to give advance notice about the project so it’s not a last-minute surprise.) Place a large basket for collecting donations near the front door or close to the main Thanksgiving festivities.

For more creative Thanksgiving craft ideas visit bhg.com

So as we begin preparations to celebrate this most special day with our families and friends, let’s take time to be mindful of the original meaning of this day and be ever thankful for our many blessings.

From my house to yours, Happy Thanksgiving!

Balancing and Reconciling Bank Accounts…Still a Good Practice

Even in this electronic age, it is still important to balance and reconcile your personal and business bank accounts. For many, balancing and reconciling their accounts is still something akin to having a root canal. But today, with online banking and smartphone apps, this seemingly outmoded exercise is easier than ever before and believe it or not, just as necessary.

Before we begin this discussion, I think it’s important to differentiate between the terms balance and reconcile. These two terms are oftentimes confusing and mistakenly used interchangeably, especially by consumers who don’t use paper checks or a check register to record their transactions.

Balancing – Balancing a check book shows how much money is available in your account at any given time. To balance an account, simply add all your new deposits to the beginning balance of the account and then subtract from that subtotal checks you’ve written, ATM and debit card transactions, cash withdrawals and bank fees. This process will determine your account balance on that given date.

Reconciling – Reconciling an account compares the bank’s records to your records – your check register. Your register should contain a running total of all of your transactions (deposits, checks, ATMs and debit card transactions, ACH debits and credits, fees, etc.). By performing this task on a routine basis you can quickly discover bank errors and most importantly, unauthorized activity.

Reconciling is completed by adding all of the deposits the bank has not yet credited to the bank’s balance and then subtracting all the payments, withdrawals and bank fees the bank has not cleared from that subtotal, confirming that the bank’s records match your check register. This should be done at least monthly – online banking allows the ability and ease to perform this procedure more frequently.

In the old days, these two tasks required paper and pencil and some mathematical calculations. Today, with the advent of technology, this process can easily be completed in minutes.

The benefits of taking the time to complete these two steps, balancing and reconciling, although much less time-consuming today, are still just as important.

By not reviewing your accounts on a monthly basis, first and foremost, you are not being a good steward of your finances. You are not keeping track of the money you spend or where you are spending it. Keeping an eye on your finances helps you maintain a healthy budget, avoiding overspending, overdrafts and incurring unnecessary and costly bank fees.

Many people are reluctant to critically examine their spending habits. The initial examination can oftentimes be painful. However, the end result, especially if this periodic looksee changes harmful spending patterns, is well worth the effort. In addition, there’s just as much value in simply making sure the math is correct.

Another very important reason to go through the balancing-reconciling-reviewing exercise is to spot financial management mistakes and fraudulent activity. This helps you recognize any unfamiliar transactions and unwanted recurring deductions. The sooner you are aware of this unauthorized activity, the sooner you and your bank can take the necessary actions and precautions.

In the end, taking a few minutes to balance, reconcile and review your bank accounts is time well spent. After all, it’s your hard-earned money!

Seasons of Change

For all intents and purposes another Florida summer is gone. The kids have all gone back to school, the lifeguard stands have been neatly tucked away for another beach going season, our vacations are but fond memories and most of us are counting the days until autumn rears its temperate head.

We typically welcome this period of change, eagerly anticipating a temporary break from the hot, humid weather for which Florida is so famous. Although our seasonal transition lags a tad behind our more northern neighbors, we can still begin to set the stage, our life for all the wonderfully renewing experiences that another season brings.

Add a Few Accents

A new season is a great time to spruce up our surroundings. Adding a few inexpensive touches to our home can make a cheerful impact on our lives – colorful pillows for sofas, new drapes, area rugs or possibly painting an accent wall a bolder, richer color will add warmth to our home.

Bring the Outside In

As the temperature cools and the days shorten, we will be spending more time inside. But we can bring a little nature inside with fresh cut flowers, branches, berries, pinecones and leaves, or even a few dried gourds, adding a lovely autumn touch to our home.

Clean Out and Stow Away

Rather than pack up all our summer gear and warm weather apparel, let’s determine what we want to retain for next year and what we don’t. We can cut down on clutter and storage by making this decision now. Let’s recycle, donate, or have a yard sale to eliminate unwanted stuff, and pack the rest away.

Freshen Up the Kitchen

It’s a perfect time to clean out our pantry, cabinets and refrigerator. Throw out all old and expired items and assess what we will need for the cooler, more comfort food cooking months ahead. In addition to weeding out and stocking up, we shouldn’t forget to give our kitchen appliances a thorough checkup to make sure they are running efficiently. This is a perfect time to vacuum the condenser coils of the refrigerator, clean the oven and eliminate the grease buildup in the oven’s vent system.

Revisit the Bucket List

As another calendar year wanes, let’s review our life list or set out to make one. Let’s jot down our goals, dreams and ambitions, and begin plotting the steps to get there.

Start Cooking Again

Nothing gives our house a homier feel, especially when it’s cooler outside, than the aroma of a delicious home-cooked meal. Let’s break out our cookbooks. Let’s be adventurous and experiment with some new recipes. Let’s start sizzling, sautéing and baking again!

Maintain a Healthy Heart

Now that the lazy days of summer are over, it’s time to light the fire within us. Let’s move our activity level up a notch. Let’s run farther or walk more briskly or add more reps to our workout. Let’s keep in good physical shape over the coming winter months and save ourselves the disappointment of wishing we had when the beach and pool going weather returns once again.

Stay In Touch

As the days grow shorter and cooler, let’s reduce the tendency to shut ourselves in by actively engaging our network of family and friends in our everyday life to maintain a healthy support system. Let’s pull out our calendar and make some dates! Let’s meet for a latte, lunch or gather for a Sunday potluck dinner, and celebrate the beauty of a new season with those we care about most!

From my house to yours, “Happy Autumn!”

Getting Ready for “Back to School”

It’s that time again. New friends, new teachers and new routines – how do you make the transition from the lazy days of summer to the school year without making life chaotic and stressful for you and your kids?

That’s the question on every parent’s mind right about now. As we move into the second week of August, we begin to realize that “back to school” is just about back!

Getting a new school year off to a good start can influence your child’s attitude, confidence, and performance both socially and academically, according to the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP). The transition from summer to the classroom can be difficult for both you and your children.

But we as parents can help our children (and the rest of our family) manage the increased pace of life that the new school year brings by planning ahead, being realistic, and maintaining a positive attitude. Here are a few suggestions from the NASP to help ease the transition and promote a successful and rewarding school experience.

Before School Starts

Good physical and mental health. Be sure your child is in good physical and mental health. Schedule doctor and dental checkups early. Discuss any concerns you have over your child’s emotional or psychological development with your pediatrician. Your doctor can help determine if your concerns are normal, age-appropriate issues or require further assessment.

Review all of the information. Review the material sent by the school as soon as it arrives. These packets include important information about your child’s teacher, room number, school supply requirements, sign ups for after-school sports and activities, school calendar dates, bus transportation, health and emergency forms, and volunteer opportunities.

Mark your calendar. Make a note of important dates, especially back-to-school nights. This is especially important if you have children in more than one school and need to juggle obligations.

Buy school supplies early. Try to get the supplies as early as possible and fill the backpacks a week or two before school starts.

Re-establish the bedtime and mealtime routines. Plan to re-establish the bedtime and mealtime routines (especially breakfast) at least one week before school starts.

Turn off the TV. Encourage your child to play quiet games, do puzzles, flash cards, color, or read as early morning activities instead of watching television. This will help ease your child into the learning process and school routine. If possible, maintain this practice throughout the school year.

Minimize clothes shopping woes. Buy only the essentials. Summer clothes are usually fine during the early fall, especially in Florida. Check with your school to confirm dress code guidelines.

Designate and clear a place to do homework. Older children should have the option of studying in their room or a quiet area of the house. Younger children usually need an area set aside in the family room or kitchen to facilitate adult monitoring, supervision, and encouragement.

Select a spot to keep backpacks and lunch boxes. Designate a spot for your children to place their school belongings as well as a place to put important notices and information sent home for you to see. Explain that emptying their backpack each evening is part of their responsibility, even for young children.

Freeze a few easy dinners. It will be much easier on you if you have dinner prepared so that meal preparation will not add to household tensions during the first week of school.

The First Week

Clear your own schedule. To the extent possible, postpone business trips, volunteer meetings, and extra projects. You want to be free to help your child acclimate to the school routine and overcome the confusion or anxiety that many children experience at the start of a new school year.

Make lunches the night before school. Older children should help or make their own. Give them the option to buy lunch in school if they prefer and finances permit.

Set alarm clocks. Have school-age children set their own alarm clocks to get up in the morning. Praise them for prompt response to morning schedules and bus pickups.

Leave plenty of extra time. Make sure your child has plenty of time to get up, eat breakfast, and get to school.

For younger children – send a brief note to your child’s teacher. . Let the teachers know that you are interested in getting regular feedback on how and what your child is doing in school. Be sure to attend back-to-school night and introduce yourself to the teachers.

Extracurricular Activities

Go for quality, not quantity. Your child will benefit most from one or two activities that are fun, reinforce social development, and teach new skills. Too much scheduled time can be stressful, especially for young children, and may make it harder to concentrate on schoolwork. When evaluating extracurricular activities, consider your family schedule and personal energy level. Multiple activities per child may be too much to manage, particularly if the activities have overlapping times, disparate locations, require your attendance, or disrupt the dinner hour.

These are some great tips for helping parents and kids get back into the swing of “back to school.”  So with this said, here’s to a great 2013-14 school year!

We All Scream for Ice Cream!

There is nothing that sings summer’s praises like ice cream – the “Great American Dessert.” Although many of us delight in this sweet icy treat all year long (for some of us, and I’m not mentioning any names, it’s one of our favorite guilty pleasures), summer seems to set the perfect stage for this longstanding frozen delicacy.

In 1984, President Ronald Reagan designated July as National Ice Cream Month and the third Saturday of the month as National Ice Cream Day. So with this in mind, I thought I’d begin the month by talking about one of America’s most popular summer desserts so we can spend the remainder of the month…summer just enjoying it.

I thought I’d start with a brief history lesson so to speak… the origin of ice cream. Then I thought I’d wrap it up with one of my favorite peach cobbler recipes – the perfect complement to your favorite ice cream. This is a summer combination sure to beat the notorious Florida heat!

Okay, let’s get started!

Ice cream’s origins date as far back as the second century B.C. Alexander the Great was known to enjoy snow and ice flavored honey with nectar. There are also Biblical references showing that King Solomon enjoyed flavored ice drinks during harvesting. During the Roman Empire, Nero Claudius Caesar frequently sent runners into the mountains for snow, which was then flavored with fruits and juices. Actually, this may have been the birth of the smoothie.

Over a thousand years later, Marco Polo returned from the Far East with a recipe that closely resembled what is now called sherbet. It is thought that this recipe evolved into ice cream sometime in the 16th century. It seems that England may have discovered ice cream at the same time or earlier than the Italians. Historians report that “Cream Ice,” as it was called, was served regularly to Charles I during the 17th century. France was introduced to this frozen dessert in 1553 by the Italian Catherine de Medici when she became the wife of Henry II of France. In 1660 ice cream was made available to the public at Café Procope, the first café in Paris. It was made from a recipe of blending milk, cream, butter and eggs.
Shortly after, the dessert was imported to the United States. During this time, many famous Americans were known to have served ice cream to their guests including George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Dolley Madison. Records kept by a Chatham Street, New York merchant show that President George Washington spent approximately $200 for ice cream during the summer of 1790. President Thomas Jefferson was said to have had a favorite ice cream recipe that resembled today’s Baked Alaska. In 1813, Dolley Madison served a scrumptious strawberry ice cream creation at President Madison’s second inaugural banquet at the White House.
The first ice cream parlor in the U.S. opened in New York City in 1776. American colonists were the first to use the term “ice cream.” The name came from the phrase “iced cream” that was similar to “iced tea.” The name was later abbreviated to the name we know today.

Until 1800, ice cream remained a rare and exotic dessert enjoyed mostly by the affluent. However, by 1851 manufacturing ice cream became an industry in America due to the pioneering of a Baltimore milk dealer named Jacob Fessell.

Like other American industries, the production of ice cream and the accessibility to the general public grew due to several technological innovations such as steam power, refrigeration, the homogenizer, electric power and motors, packing machines, and new freezing processes and equipment. Today the annual production of ice cream in the U.S. is over 1.6 billion gallons.

Now that you have enough ice cream history to cause a “brain freeze,” let’s get to the cobbler recipe so you can perform your American duty – consuming your portion of the 1.6 billion gallons that is.

Happy National Ice Cream Month to all of you!

Easy Peach Cobbler

Ingredients:
Two 15 oz. cans sliced peaches in syrup
½ cup (1 stick) of butter
1 cup of self-rising flour
1 cup of sugar
1 cup of milk

Directions:
Drain 1 can of peaches; reserve the syrup from the other. Place the butter in a 9”x 12” ovenproof baking dish. Heat the butter on the stove or in the oven until melted. In a medium bowl, mix flour and sugar. Stir in milk and the reserved peach syrup. Pour the batter over the melted butter in the baking dish. Arrange the peaches over the batter. Bake for 1 hour. Note: the cobbler is done when the batter rises around the peaches and the crust is thick and golden brown.

Serve warm with your favorite ice cream and enjoy!

It’s Time to Celebrate!

Time really does fly by when you’re having fun. I can’t believe we are about to celebrate the bank’s five-year anniversary. I feel like this celebration is more of a birthday than an anniversary because it’s really about the birth and tremendous growth of Flagler County’s first truly hometown bank – Intracoastal Bank.

When we opened our doors on June 16, 2008, we were myopically focused on one goal – to become Flagler County’s best (not biggest) bank.

As I am writing this today, I’m extremely excited and proud to say that we’ve achieved that goal and more. Due to the selfless dedication of our staff, the unwavering guidance of our board and the overwhelming loyalty and encouragement of our customers, Intracoastal Bank has (home) grown into the best banking institution in Flagler County!

A celebration would not complete however, without looking at what we – our staff, our board and our customers – have accomplished over the last five years. Incredibly, the list is long, so I thought I’d hit on a few of the highlights.

- We have grown from 10 employees to 24 employees currently on staff.

-We started the bank with no deposits or loans. Today we have approximately $187.3 million in assets, $168.4 million in deposits and $97 million in loans.

-We’ve been rated a five-star bank by Bauer Financial consistently over the past five years.

-We’ve remained committed to the betterment and economic welfare of our community. Our staff is involved in many charitable and professional organizations to include:
Flagler County Education Foundation
Take Stock in Children
United Way of Volusia/Flagler Counties
United Way of Flagler County Women’s Initiative
Flagler Habitat for Humanity
Flagler County Chamber of Commerce
Flagler County Homebuilders Association
Rotary International
Volusia Manufacturing Association
Center for Business Excellence

-We’ve been honored with the News-Tribune’s Readers’ Choice Award – voted the area’s best bank in 2010, 2011 and 2012.

-We offer leading-edge technology and banking programs. In an environment marked by incessant change, we continue to bring our customers state-of-the-art services and innovative banking solutions to make banking convenient.

We have made monumental strides in our first five years. But you can be sure; we have no intention of resting on our laurels. Over the next several months we will be unveiling several new programs/services. Some of these include payroll services for our business customers as well as a new program dedicated to our medical and executive/professional customers. In addition, we will be evaluating the addition of a mobile capture program – enabling our customers to utilize their cell phones to make deposits.

Yes, we have much to celebrate. However, we couldn’t have done it without you, our loyal customers. As we move into the next five years and beyond much will change. But the one thing you can count on to remain the same is the overriding banking philosophy that brought us to where we are today – our dedication to our customers and to community where we live and work.

So please join me in celebrating how far we’ve come and more importantly, where we’re headed. I look forward to our very bright future with all of you.

Thank you for the fun. Here’s to our first five years together and the exciting ones yet to come!