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Saving For a Rainy Day

Life seldom goes as planned. So, it’s a good idea to always be prepared for the unexpected by having a solid cushion – an emeRainy Day Fundrgency fund. Having an emergency fund will help ward off financial disaster, such as bankruptcy.

To avoid letting the unexpected lead you to financial ruin, begin building your emergency fund by following these tips:

>Figure out how much you need – Begin with a specific goal in mind. While each person’s saving goal will be different, depending on their income and expenses, a good rule of thumb is to save four to seven month’s worth of expenses. Most financial experts recommend starting small…realistic…such as saving $1,000, and then work up from there. Remember, your emergency fund is exactly that. It’s not a stockpile of savings to fund vacations or other luxuries.

>Find a safe haven for your money – Your rainy day fund should be easily accessible, but not so easy that you’ll be tempted to make unnecessary, non-emergency withdrawals. Choose a traditional savings account or possibly a money market or even a short-term certificate of deposit. This way you’ve created a psychological barrier between your spending habits and your emergency fund as well as providing you the added benefit of earning interest and requirement of continued reinvestment.

>Treat it like a recurring bill – Once you’ve established a monthly savings goal (begin with $100 per month) make it part of your regular monthly budget. The easiest way to accomplish this is by setting up an automatic monthly transfer. Just as you would with your other recurring bills (electric bill, cable bill, etc.) ensure that your emergency money is saved each month. A good practice is to pay yourself first. Have the automatic transfer set up at the beginning of the month instead of waiting to see if you have money left over at the end of the month.

>Use your emergency fund only for emergencies – Although this seems like common sense, many people forget, especially when it comes to those one-time expenses each year. Planning is the key. When determining your monthly emergency fund savings goal, keep one-time expenses such as insurance or routine car expenses in mind. Remember, if you can foresee an expense, it’s not an emergency. One way to avoid this temptation is by making access to this money somewhat difficult. Don’t ask for a debit card and if you’re issued a checkbook, hide it.

>Slow and steady wins the race – Rome wasn’t built in a day and neither is an emergency fund. Even if you can only start out with a small amount each month, any action you take towards establishing an emergency fund is a good one. But, the key is discipline. The goal is to increase your monthly deposit whenever possible and to reach $1,000 as quickly as you can. There are many ways to help you accomplish your goal in a shorter time frame. Add your tax refund or a commission check into your account, have a yard sale, sell items you don’t need on eBay or the oldie but goodie – put your change into a savings jar each evening.

The key is to save rather than blow excess or unexpected money, planning and discipline, cutting back on the “wants” or luxuries. By doing this little by little, you’ll see your emergency savings soar!

Last-minute Ways to Save for Summer Vacation

Summer is just around the corner and most of us have begun thinking about and possibly are already planning for our summer family vacations.

In an ideal world, we’d already have a fully funded vacation savings account to pay for our annual family getaway. However, the reality is that most of us wait until the last minute to begin planning and paying for our summer vacation.

So, here are a few fast track tips to help you save for your summer trip:

1. Start with a budget – discuss and determine upfront how much you want to spend on your family vacation. Have a specific figure in mind. This should include plane tickets or gas if you’re driving, hotel prices and an estimate of cost for meals, admission tickets for theme parks, museums, etc. Then, total it all up. If this figure sends you into a coronary arrest…just kidding…then cut back until you and your bank account are comfortable. The last thing you want to do is to go into debt for a vacation. If money is tight, consider taking a couple of weekend getaways instead of one big dream trip.

2. Prioritize now – are there some items currently in your budget that you can omit or would be willing to sacrifice now for a fun vacation later? Can you downgrade a plan, such as your TV cable or satellite plan or go out to eat less? A typical family with kids younger than 6 spends an average of $240 each month on restaurant meals, according to the National Restaurant Association.

So, go through your current household expenses and cut out some nonessentials or superfluous expenses. Then take that extra money and put it away in a separate vacation savings account.

3. Have a garage sale – a garage sale is a great way to earn some vacation cash quickly. Run an ad in the local paper to attract a crowd and post easy-to-read signs around your neighborhood. Get the entire family involved in this – make this a fun family affair. Have the kids go through their rooms, toy boxes, etc. and tell them whatever proceeds are collected from their items will be put towards their souvenirs. This is also a fun spring-cleaning project. It’s a win-win.

4. Use your tax refund now – if you typically get a sizeable income tax refund from the IRS every year, you are probably having too much money withheld from your paycheck. If this is the case, fill out a new W-4 form and adjust your withholding so that it’s fairly close to what you owe each year. Then begin transferring that extra money into your dedicated vacation savings account. If you still get a refund, stash that away as well.

5. Let your credit cards help pay for your vacation – in the months prior to your vacation, use your credit cards with reward points for everything your normally pay for with cash, debit card or check. Use these accumulated points towards plane tickets, hotels, rental cars and gift cards for restaurants. But, make sure to pay off the balance on your card in full every month or you’re defeating the purpose of a debt-free vacation.

6. Get everyone involved in the saving excitement – chart your savings with a graph, much like you see with fundraisers, on a large poster board. Track your weekly and monthly progress with colorful markers. You can even reward yourself and your family for reaching certain goals, e.g. go out for ice cream when you’ve reach a savings milestone.

In a nutshell, make a realistic plan for your family summer vacation, save for your plan and make the process a fun family affair! By doing this, you will be creating special memories instead of debt.

Getting Your Fiscal House in Order in 2014

Getting Your Fiscal House in Order in 2014

By now, most of you diehard “resolutionists” have committed your 2014 goals to paper. You are full of confidence or at least a hopeful expectation that this year will be the year you really get your life in order. You’ve vowed not to repeat past mistakes and are ready to take the bull, the new year, by the horns.

Before the year gets away from you, as they always seem to do, and you find some of your goals falling by the wayside, again, as they always seem to do, you may want to make sure you get your fiscal house in order first. After all, most people’s resolutions consistently revolve around two things: health and money.

Even the federal government has a New Year’s Resolutions site with links of references to help you stay on track. Not too surprisingly, three of the 13 most popular resolutions are money focused – getting a job, saving money and managing debt.

So before you get caught up in life and your best New Year’s intentions fade away with the glitter of the holiday season, consider the following financial checklist for the new year.

Meet with a financial advisor. If you haven’t had a discussion with a financial advisor in some time, or ever, now is the time to do so. It’s never too early or too late to begin planning for your future/retirement. If you already have a financial advisor it is a good idea to meet with him or her at least once a year to monitor your progress and evaluate your plan.

Look at your taxes. If you are one of the many April 15 procrastinators this could be the year to change that. While you are waiting on your W-2s, 1099s, etc., you can begin getting your receipts in order and/or schedule an appointment with your tax preparer. Why not take the stress off tax season this year and get your taxes done early, especially if you are getting a refund. Please note that the earliest day the IRS will be processing 2013 individual tax returns this year is Jan. 31. This date is slightly later than usual due to the government shutdown last fall.

Develop or review your budget. If you haven’t created a budget, create one, or if you haven’t looked at your budget in some time, it’s time to update it. Things change (having a baby, elimination of a debt, an increase in household utilities, etc.) and consequently this affects your budget. This is also great time to re-evaluate your expenses. Cancel subscriptions or services you never use and contact companies that your do business with regularly (e.g. your cable company) to see if they can offer you a better rate. Increase deductibles on your automobile, home or medical insurance, if possible, to lower your monthly premiums.

Update your will. Like your budget, any changes, good or bad (e.g. divorce), can affect your will. If you don’t have a will, now is a good time to draft one.

Check your credit report. With identity theft on the rise, it’s very wise to monitor your credit. At annualcreditreport.com, you can get a free credit report from each of the three credit reporting agencies once a year.

Evaluate your retirement situation (ties in with ‘Meet with a financial advisor’). If you haven’t begun putting away money for retirement, there is no time better than now to start. Most financial experts will tell you to set aside 10 to 15 percent of your annual income each year for retirement. However, if you can’t manage that, put away as much as you can. Remember, saving something is better than nothing.

If you are on target with your yearly retirement contributions, it’s a great time to review your retirement accounts and strategies. If possible, according to financial experts, savers should increase their retirement contributions by 1 percent each year. You should continue this increase every year as long as you can until you are saving the maximum allowed by the IRS.

As is the case when making any major changes in your life, Rome was not built in a day. However, if you will commit to at least one of these recommendations, your 2014 finances are sure to see an improvement over 2013.

Experience the Celebrated Colors of Fall Close to Home

Although we Floridians are continuing to experience muggy, summer-like days, most other areas of the country are meandering into one of the most beautiful seasons of the year – fall.

Even though I’ve lived in Florida for over twenty years, having grown up in New York, fall remains the season I miss most. Oh sure, northern Florida gets a taste of fall, but it is quite dull in comparison to the vibrant, rich colors observed by our colder states.

One of the many benefits of living in central to northern Florida – other than the fact it doesn’t snow or more accurately, accumulate snow here – is our close proximity to the true fall – the kind all of us more northern transplants fondly remember and often yearn for each year around this time.

A recent Southern Living article I came across listed the best places in the south for experiencing the radiant colors of fall. I thought I’d share a few with you which are fairly close to home.

So, before this incredible color-packed foliage disappears (peak season is usually the second and third week of October), pack a bag, gas up the car and take a delightfully unexpected trip and celebrate the true colors of fall!

Enjoy your trip and tell me all about it when you return!

1. Ellijay, GA
Ellijay is located on the edge of the Chattahoochee National Forest, about 80 miles north of Atlanta. This town and surrounding Gilmer County are known for being the apple capitol of Georgia, claiming 10 pick-your-own apples orchards.

2. Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest, Clermont, KY
This forest is located just south of Louisville in Clermont. It includes 14,000 acres of fields and forests and 35 miles of hiking trails. For the biking enthusiast, there is a bike route that winds along the beautifully fall-colored Long Lick Creek.

3. Hanging Rock State Park, Danbury, NC
This state 7, 024 acre park, which boasts some of the best colors of fall in North Carolina, is approximately 30 miles north of Winston-Salem. You will find mountains rising more than 2,500 ft., cascading waterfalls and more!

4. Lover’s Leap Loop Trail, Hot Springs, NC
The Lover’s Leap Loop Trail overlooks the French Broad River and the town of Hot Springs, North Carolina. A hiker’s heaven – offering 1.6 mile miles of the Appalachian Trail. With its panoramic views of the Blue Ridge Mountains, you won’t want to miss this!

5. Mountain National Park, Gatlinburg, TN
This most visited national park offers acres of fall colors and incredible wildlife to include white-tailed deer, wild turkeys and black bears. This park spreads across 800 acres of the southern Appalachian Mountains, winding through Tennessee and North Carolina.

6. Natchez Trace Parkway, TN
The Natchez Trace Parkway runs through Tennessee, Alabama, and Mississippi. It connects the cities of Nashville, Tennessee and Natchez, Mississippi. Approximately 100 miles of this parkway runs through Tennessee and passes through such towns as Leipers Fork, and several historic spots.