Celebrations of the Season

December marks the beginning of the most celebrated holiday season in America. However, many people will be celebrating something other than the highly anticipated arrival of jolly, old St. Nick and the birth of Jesus Christ.

Over the next few weeks, while many of us are rejoicing the season by decorating our trees, adorning our homes with colorful lights and nativity scenes, braving over-crowded malls in an attempt to buy that special something for someone to place under the tree, sending out festive/religious cards near and far, and attending holiday parties, merrily donning our ugly holiday sweaters, others will be celebrating in a very different way.

Yes, Christmas is only one of several holidays, here and around the world, which is celebrated during the month of December.

Bodhi Day 

Buddhists celebrate Bodhi day, which falls on December 8. This celebration recalls the date when Buddha attained enlightenment.

The Day of the Return of the Wandering Goddess

Synchronized with the Winter Solstice, this holiday has been observed by followers of Kemetic Orthodoxy, the religion of ancient Egypt, since about 4500 BCE. It celebrates the return of the Goddess Hathor to her father Ra and the healing of their relationship.

Hanukkah

This holiday, celebrated by Jewish people, honors the Maccabees’s victory over King Antiochus, who forbade Jews to practice their religion. For eight nights – this year it starts the evening of December 12 and ends on December 20 (the dates change because this holiday follows the lunar cycle) – Hanukkah is celebrated with prayer, the lighting of the menorah and food. A Hanukkah menorah has nine candles, a candle for every night, plus a helper candle.

Over the eight days, children play games, sing songs, spin a top called a dreidel to win chocolate coins, nuts or raisins, and exchange gifts. Potato pancakes, known as latkes in Yiddish, served with applesauce and sour cream, are traditionally associated with this Jewish holiday. 

Winter Solstice

The Winter Solstice, an astronomical phenomenon marking the shortest day of the year, occurs between December 20 and 23 in the Northern Hemisphere.

Since ancient times, people all over the world have recognized this important astronomical occurrence and celebrated the subsequent return of the sun.

The start of the solar year is a celebration of light and the rebirth of the sun. In Europe, it was known as Yule, from the Norse, Jul, meaning wheel.

St. Lucia Day 

On December 13, this Swedish holiday honors this third-century saint. Many girls in Sweden dress up as “Lucia brides, donning long white gowns with red sashes, and a wreath of burning candles on their heads. They wake up their families on this day by singing them songs and bringing them coffee and twisted saffron buns called “Lucia cats.”

Kwanzaa

Kwanzaa, which means “First Fruits,” is celebrated December 26 through January 1. This African holiday, based on ancient harvest festivals, celebrates family life and unity, commemorating African heritage. Friends and family gather to exchange gifts and to light a series of black, red, and green candles. These candles symbolize the seven basic values of African family life – unity, self-determination, collective work and responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity, and faith.

Three Kings Day 

At the end of the Twelve Days of Christmas comes a day, which is celebrated in Spain, called Epiphany or Three Kings Day. This holiday is celebrated as the day the three wise men first saw baby Jesus and brought him gifts. Many Spanish children receive their Christmas presents on this day.

Yes, this is truly a wondrous time of year! And no matter how you celebrate this holiday season, I hope it is filled with love and laughter, and creating long-lasting memories with family and friends.

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